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Dear the forum,

I'm a newbie here and I'm learning English. Firstly, let me say sorry if my question is duplicated to what someone has already posted.

The problem I'm wondering is how to say, in English, the root of someone. For example, if there is a person who is an American, but lives all the time in France, then how do people call him? An American-root(ed) French or what?

Do you understand my idea? If I make sense to you, please correct me the exact way to say. Emotion: smile

PS: sorry for my bad English, as a learner. If you can, please be so kind to answer me here, to email to me: Email Removed Thanks a lot.

My kind regards
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Hi,

I'm a newbie here and I'm learning English. Firstly, let me say sorry if my question is duplicated to what someone has already posted.

Welcome to the Forum.

The problem I'm wondering is how to say, in English, the root of someone. For example, if there is a person who is an American, but lives all the time in France, then how do people call him? An American-root(ed) French or what?

An expatriate American. Commonly, 'an ex-pat'.

I wouldn't even consider 'root' in this connection. When you speak of someone's 'roots', you are usually thinking of where their ancestors lived.

Best wishes, Clive
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Thanks you for the response.

If you say "ex-pat" American, people will know that person is American, but they won't know about the French issue. I want to refer something like "a american who has the French nationality or lives all the time in French but actually he has origin from American", so that's why I try to mix the word. And yes, it's the "ancestor" I want to describle.

Do you understand? I know it's a little complicated.

Maybe in English, you don't have that kind of saying, do you?
Hi,

I'd just say 'an American who lives in France'.Emotion: smile

Clive