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Sometimes you cannot use your own address to receive a mail. Then you might use a friend's address as an intermediary to let the mail pass through your friend, then to you. Should I use c/o? How do I write the receiver's name in appropriate format on the envelope?
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Yes. Here is one way of addressing:



Mr. John Doe

c/o Mrs. Gladly To Help

123 Any Street

Any City, Any State Zip

USA
So it means that I was the Mr. John Doe, and the the letter will pass through Mrs ... to me. Right?
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Yes, correct.
In think c/o means "care of".
High school students now have borrowed the c/o to indicate class of as in "c/o 2007".
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
PhilipHigh school students now have borrowed the c/o to indicate class of as in "c/o 2007".
Interesting.
It is amazing that people do not remember the proper way to address a letter, pkg. etc....

I have to hold my tongue at work when I see our customer svc rep. who is also in charge of filling out the "ship to" fields of an order. How can I remind her of the correct way, without sounding too critical?
I would tell her that "we need to standardize our address label for all outgoing mail by putting xxx on the first line and c/o on the second line".
Well, just my thoughts.
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