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Example 1:The test tube used in the experiment was broken by Tom.

(=The test tube was used in the experiment. The test tube was then broken.)

Example 2:Tom being send to Internetional school is very naught.

(=Tom is sent to Internetional school. He is very naught.)

"used in the experiment" & "being send to internetional school" are participle phrases of "was used" & " is sent" respectively, but why the first one have a extra word "being" ?

Thank for answering^^
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Hello Anon

I guess you wanted to ask us as below:
"Used in the experiment" and "sent to international school" below are both participle phrases, but why the second one has a extra word "being" ?
EX-1: The test tube used in the experiment was broken by Tom.
(=The test tube was used in the experiment. The test tube was then broken.)
EX-2 : Tom being sent to the International School is very naught.
(=Tom is sent to the International School. He is very naught.)

EX-1 is a correct sentence. The phrase "used in the experiment" is interpreted as an elided form of "(which was/had been) used in the experiment". This sort of construct is called "whiz deletion" by linguists. EX-2 sounds odd. It is taken as if saying "That Tom is sent to the International School is very naught". Does it make sense to you?

paco
Sometimes i can see the sentence use "being+ past participle" to modify a noun,

can you give me some example ?
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AnonymousSometimes i can see the sentence use "being+ past participle" to modify a noun,

can you give me some example ?

(1)Student being sent to school have bad acadermic preformance.
(2)I saw a boy being carried by a man.

why my teacher say this two sentence is correct?

Thank~~
"Noun being past participle" is possible when the phrase is "noun who is/was being past participle" before "whiz deletion".
(EX)
The gentleman (who is) being interviewed over there is one of this year's Nobel laureates in medicine.
= The gentleman being interviewed over there is one of this year's Nobel laureates in medicine.


You can't say "Tom who is being sent to the International School is naught". Tom is Tom. There should be no Tom, who can be restrictively modified by a restrictive relative clause.

paco
What does the sentence mean, BTW?
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Are these sentences right?

Tom, who is sent to internetional school, is very naught.

The boy being sent to internetional school is very naught.

The boy sent to internetional school is very naught.

Thank~^^
Hello Anon

I guess you are asking about sentence structures. But I'd like to make some comments on your sentences in regards to their meaning.

First of all, I'm afraid you might confuse "naught" and "naughty". "Naught" is commonly used to mean "nothing" (or "zero"), although it could mean "a person who is bad". "Naughty" is an adjective to describe a child who is disobedient and doing wrong. Don't you mean "naughty" instead of "naught"?

Secondly I can hardly understand the situation where a child is being sent to a school. "Tom was sent to International School London (a proper name of a school) to learn English" would be possible. This "send" is a one-time action verb. "Right now my mother is sending Tom to the school by car" would be possible if you want to state the activity of "sending" in progress. But I'm rather uncomfortable with an expression such as "He is/was being sent to the school".

If I were you, I might say like:
Tom, who was sent to Internetional School last week, is a naughty kid.
The boy sent to an internetional school in London last year is very naughty.

paco
O...you are right, i want to express the boy is "naughty" not "naugh".

thank you,now i understand how to use participle phrase.
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