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Hi,

I was looking at an old newspaper and saw this partial sentence with a date which is underlined below and am wondering how many varieties can prevail.

At a summit in Kyongju, South Korea, in November 2005, Bush first announced that ...

I think I these varieties can work too (I am focusing on the various ways the dates can be written in differing situations):

At a summit in Kyongju, South Korea, in November of 2005, Bush first announced that ...

The summit in Kyongju, South Korea, was held in November of 2005.

The summit in Kyongju, South Korea, was held in November, 2005.

The summit in Kyongju, South Korea, was held in November 2005.
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Comments  
You can write dates almost the way you want, but be consistent.
And the frequently used way is like?
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I personally avoid writing "of" in dates, though you say it.
Don't put a comma between the month and the year. November 2005 or November of 2005, but not Novemeber, 2005.

Edited to clarify: In American style! (thanks for the reminder Nona)
I would recommend always using the ISO 8601 standard for writing dates:
YYYY
or
YYYY-MM
or
YYYY-MM-DD

So November 2005 would be written: 2005-11.
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That only applies in American English.
Marvin A.I would recommend always using the ISO 8601 standard for writing dates:
YYYY
or
YYYY-MM
or
YYYY-MM-DD

So November 2005 would be written: 2005-11.
If you are writing technical specifications or meeting minutes, perhaps, but in normal prose that would look ridiculous.
Is it correct to write October 10th instead of October 10 and if so is there a book I can site this information from, or is there a name for this substitution that makes it grammatically correct
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