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Hi everybody,

I just read an article about Migraine, and here is a sentence bewilders me.

"Anyone who has compared notes with other sufferers knows migraines are infuriatingly individual, with one common characteristic: sudden head pain that sees them heading for a darkened room."

Could anybody tell me how to understand the words "note", "infuriatingly individual"???

many thanks.

thanks for the answer, however, we still got confusion about the understanding of "infuriatingly individual".
how should we understand "individual" here? that indicates migraine or people?
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Hi,
I just read an article about Migraine, and here is a sentence bewilders me.

"Anyone who has compared notes compared information about their experiences
with other sufferers knows migraines are infuriatingly individual,it's very annoying that every migraine is different/unique (except for one thing, sudden head pain)
with one common characteristic: sudden head pain that sees them heading for a darkened room."

Could anybody tell me how to understand the words "note", "infuriatingly individual"???

Best wishes, Clive
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"Comparing notes" is a very common fixed expression. "Let's compare notes." Literally, that could be a group of classmates getting together to study for final exams. "Notes" are personal. They record the way you personally perceived something. You all sat through the same lectures, but each of you picked up on different points.

In the case at hand, you all have notes on migraines, but your own personal migraines. You find when you compare them, that they are so different that it drives you absolutely nutz. How can you make any sense of it??

As the expression is often figurative, the physical "notes" may not exist. You're comparing what you might have written had you actually taken "notes."
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