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Hi teachers,
In relation to this question, 'How much of their schoolwork do the children do at home?' This is the correct answer according to a text, 'All of it.'
A teacher told me that 'all' in that answer is a noun. Could it be a pronoun in fact?

I know that after and adjective 'all' is always a noun like in the following:
I didn't give it my all.
He puts his all in every game.

My question is, how do I know that the word 'all' is a noun in that phrase? What tells me that it is a noun. How can I easily recognize when 'all' is a noun?

Thanks in advance.
Comments  
Thinking SpainA teacher told me that 'all' in that answer is a noun. Could it be a pronoun in fact?
Noun. Pronoun. Maybe it doesn't matter. They both function the same way in sentences.

It really depends on the grammar book you consult. Some may say it's a noun; others may say it's a pronoun.

The question is whether you're teaching your students to speak (read, write) English or teaching them to label words in English sentences. If you only want to do the latter, then you may have to make an arbitrary decision about what "all" is, and make your students say "noun" (or "pronoun") when they need to label "all" in a sentence. Or follow the lead of whatever book your students use. If you are interested in the former, it doesn't matter what they call it.

CJ
CalifJimNoun. Pronoun. Maybe it doesn't matter. They both function the same way in sentences
Hi Jim,
Thank you so much for your reply. This time it's not for my students, just for my knowledge.

With personal pronouns, we use 'all of' + object form, don't we?
In the given answer, 'all of it', 'it' substitudes 'their homework', doesn't it?
What does 'all' substitude? Is it a silly question?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thinking SpainThis time it's not for my students, just for my knowledge.
Ah! In that case you can just pick whichever grammar approach you like and stick with that.
Thinking SpainWith personal pronouns, we use 'all of' + object form, don't we?In the given answer, 'all of it', 'it' substitudes 'their homework', doesn't it?
Yes and yes.
Thinking SpainWhat does 'all' substitute?
How much? (from the question)

How much (of)? asks for the proportional amount. Possible answers: all of; some of; none of.

CJ
CalifJimHow much? (from the question)How much (of)? asks for the proportional amount. Possible answers: all of; some of; none of.
Hi Jim,
Great! Now, I understand it. It doesn't substitute anything. Well, yes it does, but basically answers the question 'how much'!
Can I really use 'substitude' in this context? I think it is better to say it 'answers'. Right?
By the way, what are these expressions called 'all of; some of; none of'? Because they are not quantity words.

TS
Off topic
Which one?
a) I understand it very good.
b) I understand it very well.
It's 'a', right? Because 'understand' is a non-action verb.

Thanks.
Thinking SpainCan I really use 'substitute' in this context?
I suppose you could. It's like saying that "a watch" substitutes for "what" in the following:

What did you buy?
I bought a watch.
Thinking Spainwhat are these expressions called 'all of; some of; none of'? Because they are not quantity words.
They do relate to quantities even though they consist of more than one word. I have seen them called determinatives.
I don't see any harm in calling them quantifiers.
_____

a) I understand it very good. > wrong (Lo entiendo/comprendo muy bueno??? Are you kidding?)
b) I understand it very well. > right (You know this!!!)

You need well because you need an adverb. 'understand' is not a linking verb. Only linking verbs take adjectives like 'good'.
'Linking' is not the same as 'non-action'.

He is good. He became tired. He looks sick. He seems happy.
He understands it well. He plays football well. He knows her well.

CJ
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CalifJima) I understand it very good. > wrong (Lo entiendo/comprendo muy bueno??? Are you kidding?). Emotion: embarrassed I had a confusion with 'linkng' and 'non-action' verbs.
b) I understand it very well. > right (You know this!!!) Yes, I do.
CalifJimThey do relate to quantities even though they consist of more than one word. I have seen them called determinatives.I don't see any harm in calling them quantifiers. Thank you.
Hi Jim,
Thank you very much for you reply, examples, and additional explanations.

TS