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1. He studied very hard, however, he didn't pass the exam.

2. He studied very hard; however, he didn't pass the exam.

3. He studied very hard. However, he didn't pass the exam.

Which of the above sentences is not acceptable?
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Teo1. He studied very hard, however, he didn't pass the exam.

2. He studied very hard; however, he didn't pass the exam.

3. He studied very hard. However, he didn't pass the exam.

Which of the above sentences is not acceptable?

Number 1.
1. He studied very hard, however, he didn't pass the exam.

2. He studied very hard; however, he didn't pass the exam.

3. He studied very hard. However, he didn't pass the exam.

Which of the above sentences is not acceptable?

Of the three sentences, they all sounded acceptably correct in conversation. However, if examined carefully in written form, I think, in my opinion, only # 3 is correct. Because when we used “however” something with a negative outcome is to follow as a rule. The first segment of the sentence “He studied very hard” is a complete thought. To continue with the additional information, the next segment needs to be a new sentence thus a period should be placed after “he studied very hard”. So # 3 is my choice. I could be wrong!
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Hello Clive,

It seems the consensus is on #2. Is # 3 incorrect?

I'd like to know...

Thanks
I tend to recycle all those semi-colons that Clive doesn't want. So #2 for me; then #3; but not #1.

That said, many native speakers seem to plump for the #1 form these days. And some use the #1 form but omit the comma after "however".

MrP
Hi,

My order of preference is:

#3 - Simple and straightforward.

#1 - (but I'd often omit the comma after 'however', as MrP suggests.)

#2 - I see this as the Devil's handiwork.

Best wishes, Clive
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#1 is not a run-on sentence, but a comma splice.
What does the Devil's handiwork mean?
Hi,

What does the Devil's handiwork mean? Something cleverly and skillfully made by the Devil in order to torment people and lead them into sin.

I said this as a humorous way of saying I didn't like that sentence with the semi-colon. It was a feeble little joke.

Best wishes, Clive
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