+0
Hello,
I am going through a list of phrasal verbs and there are some that seem to me non-phrasal verbs. Among them there is "hunt for". Is it a phrasal verb or not?

Thank you.
+0
Hi Magda

According to this definition, hunt for isn't a phrasal verb. http://www.usingenglish.com/glossary/phrasal-verb.html
I'm sure there are other definitions.

Cheers
CB
Comments  
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hi Cool Breeze,
thanks for the link. So according to it "look after", "look at", "wait on", "wait for" are phrasal verbs. Right?
MagdaHi Cool Breeze,
thanks for the link. So according to it "look after", "look at", "wait on", "wait for" are phrasal verbs. Right?
Magda, I am not so sure what each and every one of us wants to call a phrasal verb. I never use that term. The definition behind the link I gave you says the meaning of the verb has to be modified or changed to warrant the term 'phrasal verb'. I wouldn't say at changes the meaning of look, nor does for change the meaning of wait, to my mind anyway. You'll have to make your own judgements. I don't think there is universal agreement on this point.

Grammatical terminology varies quite a lot of from country to country and language to language. For example, in Latin, Finnish or Swedish grammar this and similar pronouns are never called adjectives, and my British dictionaries don't use that term either. However, American dictionaries do classify this as an adjective in certain contexts. To me, an adjective is an answer to the question 'What is X like?' Or: 'What kind of an X is it?' So I can say:

a new car, an expensive car, a Korean car.

I can never say:
a this car.

I can of course say: this car, but I point at the car and therefore I call this a demonstrative pronoun.

Cheers
CB
Cool Breeze,
thank you for the explanation. I wish my teachers could explain things as clearly as you.

Best regards Emotion: smile
M
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies