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Hi guys,

may I ask you for help with the word "hup" in the next situation. That sentences are self-explanatory, more or less, but if more context is necessary to provide, please let me know.Emotion: smile

A: I did check out the barrack's sign-out log from '05.
B: All of them?
A: Hup two. (???)


According the urbandictionary portal, hup is a contradiction of heads up....So please, what is A saying? I'm about to check the second one????/ working on the second one?

thanks in advance guys

Best Regards

JCD
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JCD:

It is a military expression. Usually, "hup, hup" (Hup two is two hups) Generally the drill seargeant shouts "hup, hup" or "hup to" to his unit. It means something like "get going", "here's the beat to march to", An American football quarterback will say "Hup, hup" to break the huddle and get started with a new play. Here it might mean "heads up" because their heads are all down together in the huddle.
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Many people return from military service and join the police force. People who are now in civilian life and have shared military life often share military allusions.
I'd probably have to hear the inflection (and have not personally been in the military - but let's face it, we've all seen our share of movies), but I'm thinking in terms of the drill sargent and the trainee in boot camp. The seargant says "jump" and the trainee says, "How high, Sir?" The most common command in boot camp is probaby, "March!" - and the response is "Hup, two, three, four, hup, two, three, four."

So cop B is suggesting that cop A repeat the task correctly (thoroughly), and cop A's response in psuedo military jargon implies that cop B is acting like a drill seargant. (Sorry - couldn't think of a quicker way.)
I may be way off base.
I think that regardless of its etymology, "Hup" is favored for its staccato barking sound, and as an attention getter and clear, easy way to mark a rhythm.
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AlpheccaStars
It is a military expression. Usually, "hup, hup" (Hup two is two hups) Generally the drill seargeant shouts "hup, hup" or "hup to" to his unit. It means something like "get going", "here's the beat to march to".

Thanks, Alphecca.[Y] So may I take "hup hup" here as..."I'll be done with it any minute?".

More context: Persons A and B are two cops. Cop "A" had to go through the sign-out logs of the school which is being investigated, to find out which student had been spending the weekends inside of the school instead of by the parents, for example. Cop "B" was asking first whether cop "A" saw a letter which was sitting on his desk, "A" answered that he didn't,

- but that he did check out the barrack's sign-out log from '05.

B: All of them?

A: Hup two....(Said with very ironic tone). There's only one cadet who never left the barracks on a weekend.....

I thought it that it's gonna be some kind of metaphore from the american fotball..Emotion: smile. I'm the person addicted to the ice hockey, american fotball is totally out of my league...Emotion: smile. So I'm lost in this..Emotion: smile

thanks in advance Alphecca for additional help.Emotion: smile

Best Regards

 Avangi's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Alphecca and Avangi, many thanks for great help! [Y]

Best Regards

JCD