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I'm subtitling a commercial that will play in Times Square and would like to know if in the sentence,

"Notice the life-like color on this yellow seahorse."

...should life-like be hyphenated? I'm going to go out on a limb here and say it does as it's a compound adjective. Or am I wrong?

Thanks much.
Chris
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The question is whether it should be hyphenated ("life-like") or one word ("lifelike"). To me, both are acceptable, but "lifelike" seems less fussy.

(I assume it's not a real seahorse?)
Mr WordyThe question is whether it should be hyphenated ("life-like") or one word ("lifelike"). To me, both are acceptable, but "lifelike" seems less fussy.

(I assume it's not a real seahorse?)

I prefer the fussy life-like, just because of how it looks.

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PhilipI prefer the fussy life-like, just because of how it looks.
I assume you mean it looks very life-like that way. Emotion: smile

CJ
Well, it's video of a real seahorse displayed in the television that is in the commercial. The actor points out how life-like the seahorse is on the TV he's standing next to. The whole gag is your TV isn't this new one so you can't really see how great it looks.

So far it looks like I'm sticking with the hyphen. Any nay-sayers?

Thanks!
Chris
CalifJim
PhilipI prefer the fussy life-like, just because of how it looks.
I assume you mean it looks very life-like that way.

CJ
You could put it that way. I think that the combination of the letters li...+li...is a bit congested.

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Thanks, all. I went with "life-like". If you're in Times Square in the next couple of weeks, look for the Sharp Quattron spot playing on the jumbotron.

Peace.
Chris

I'm going with life-like Emotion: big smile

It's one word in US English, "lifelike".

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