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I have found a website relating to my question.

Can I use a hyphen to say this instead of the above?

I have found a question-related website.

Regarding the below sentence, 'age category' makes sense, so I presume any noun can be used before the word category. Correct?

Sorry for placing you in the same age category/age bracket as my grandmother.

Sorry for placing you in the same skill-category as my grandmother.

What about this?

Sorry for placing you in the same computer-skills category as my grandmother.

Now this doesn't seem right...

Many thanks.
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Hi,

I have found a website relating to my question.

Can I use a hyphen to say this instead of the above?

I have found a question-related website.

The hyphen makes the meaning less precise. This sounds like a web-site that deals with questions in general, not just with my question.

Regarding the below sentence, 'age category' makes sense, so I presume any noun can be used before the word category. Correct?

Sorry for placing you in the same age category/age bracket as my grandmother.

Sorry for placing you in the same skill-category as my grandmother.

Thanks perhaps to usage, I feel I more or less understand the term 'age bracket', and even perhaps 'age-category'.

But I don't have a good understanding of the meaning of 'skill-category'.

eg What skills are we talking about? Knitting? Power-tools?

eg Are the categories 'poor skills', 'average skills', 'good skills'?

eg Are the categories 'can boil an egg', 'can make an omelette'?

What about this?

Sorry for placing you in the same computer-skills category as my grandmother.

Now this doesn't seem right...

It's not really wrong, but the hyphen creates an expression that lacks precision, as I said. It leaves the reader to figure out what the heck you mean.

Clive
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CliveBut I don't have a good understanding of the meaning of 'skill-category'.
eg What skills are we talking about? Knitting? Power-tools?
eg Are the categories 'poor skills', 'average skills', 'good skills'?
eg Are the categories 'can boil an egg', 'can make an omelette'?

Isn't it explained through context already mentioned?

"You are nearly as good at knitting as my husband."

"Thanks for putting me in the same skill-category as your husband!"
Hi,

Yes, context certainly helps. Even a poorly expressed statement is easier to understand in context.

Context is important, or perhaps I should say there is a lot of context-importance.

Which of these two statements do you find clearer and more precise? Or do you see them as pretty well the same?

Clive
True, true. Thank you. Emotion: big smile
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