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Let's set some context:

Person A knocks on person B's door.

Person B: "Oh no! He's here to rob us!"

Person A: "If I was here to rob you, I wouldn't have knocked."

I know this is a hypothetical statement, but is this a hypothetical statement for the past, or present?

Could be present because the person is explaining why the person is at the house.

Could be past because the person said "I wouldn't have knocked", referring to the past.

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Julian Ng-Thow-Hingis this a hypothetical statement for the past, or present?

It's for both. You've already explained that at the end of your post.

CJ

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Thank you for your answer, Califjim.

So in the sentence: "If I was here to kill you, I wouldn't have knocked." 

"If I was here to kill you" refers to the present, regarding an assumption of why he is at the house.

"I wouldn't have knocked" refers to the past, used to explain why the assumption is false. 

So, this hypothetical statement refers to both the present and the past, in an attempt to explain why the assumption of why the person is at the house (present) is false. 

Julian Ng-Thow-Hing

So in the sentence: "If I was here to kill you, I wouldn't have knocked."

"If I was here to kill you" refers to the present, regarding an assumption of why he is at the house.

"I wouldn't have knocked" refers to the past, used to explain why the assumption is false.

Your explanation sounds completely reasonable to me. Yes.

Julian Ng-Thow-HingSo, this hypothetical statement refers to both the present and the past, in an attempt to explain why the assumption of why the person is at the house (present) is false.

Correct.

CJ

hello Califjim,

I have trouble understanding this one: "If I wanted to kill you, you would be dead days ago."

Is this also referring to the present, and past? Or just the past?


This situation is different as if the first part is referring to the present, it's not really making since with the second part.

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Julian Ng-Thow-HingI have trouble understanding this one: "If I wanted to kill you, you would be dead days ago."

Me too. That's because it's not right. It seems the speaker made a substitution of "wanted" for "had wanted", and it all went wrong from there on because normally this would be

If I had wanted to kill you, you would have been dead days ago. (all past point of view)

CJ

In the conversation:

A: "Don't you want to kill me?"

B: "When did you start thinking that?"
A: "5 days ago... when you got mad."

B: "Oh, I'm over that, if I had wanted to kill you, you would've been dead 5 days ago."

It is the proper usage to use "had", to refer to the past, instead of omitting had, referring to the present?


Let's set some context:

(from some movie - it's a dumb movie)

Person A is in a fight with Person B. Person A plans to kill Person B (sorry if this bothers you). Person A goes to Person B's house to kill Person B, though when Person A is approaching Person B's door, knocks on Person B's door, and Person B opens it. Person A sees his child. He plans to not kill Person B anymore.

In this conversation:

A: "Are you here to kill me?"

B: "No. If I was here to kill you (referring to present), I wouldn't have knocked on your door (referring to past)." (I'm not here to kill you because I knocked on your door)

Would this be considered lying? I know it seems unrealistic, but pretend that this did happen. I believe it isn't considered lying, as it is true that he is not there to kill Person B (in the present), but then again, when he did knock on the door, he was planning to kill person B. (I know this is confusing, but bear with me)

Julian Ng-Thow-Hing

In the conversation:

A: "Don't you want to kill me?"

B: "When did you start thinking that?"
A: "5 days ago... when you got mad."

B: "Oh, I'm over that, if I had wanted to kill you, you would've been dead 5 days ago."

It is the proper usage to use "had", to refer to the past, instead of omitting had, referring to the present?

Yes.

Present hypothetical condition, present or future result:
IF [past], WOULD ....
Past hypothetical condition, unfulfilled, past result, unfulfilled:
IF HAD [past participle], ... WOULD HAVE [past participle] ....

Julian Ng-Thow-Hing

Person A is in a fight with Person B. Person A plans to kill Person B (sorry if this bothers you). Person A goes to Person B's house to kill Person B, though when Person A is approaching Person B's door, knocks on Person B's door, and Person B opens it. Person A sees his child. He plans to not kill Person B anymore.

In this conversation:

A: "Are you here to kill me?"

B: "No. If I was here to kill you (referring to present), I wouldn't have knocked on your door (referring to past)." (I'm not here to kill you because I knocked on your door)

Would this be considered lying?

Yes.
"Person A plans to kill Person B."
"... Person A ... knocks on Person B's door."
(He still plans to kill Person B.)
"Person A sees [Person B's] child."
(He still plans to kill Person B.)
"He plans to not kill Person B anymore."
(Now he has changed his mind.)

Before he changed his mind, he knocked on the door. He intended to kill B during the time he knocked on B's door, so it's a lie to say that knocking on the door is a sign that A didn't want to kill B, which is what the sentence says, namely, If I was here to kill you, I wouldn't have knocked on your door. In fact, he was there to kill B and he did knock on the door.

Julian Ng-Thow-HingI know it seems unrealistic, but pretend that this did happen. I believe it isn't considered lying, as it is true that he is not there to kill Person B (in the present), but then again, when he did knock on the door, he was planning to kill person B.

To a native speaker, it still sounds like a lie. Native speakers do not analyze what others say so closely as you are doing — except in a court of law. We'll have to wait until this question comes up in court and see what the members of the jury decide. We already know how you and I would vote.

Julian Ng-Thow-HingI know this is confusing, but bear with me.

You ask a lot.

CJ

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I know I do, sorry. I do have autism, which might be why. I have been learning English for quite a while, yet I still get stuck on some parts.

I did some research.

Here it goes -

If the person said: "Originally, I planned on killing you, but I'm not here to kill you anymore." This is the truth.

If the person said: "No." That is the truth, but also deceptive (the person doesn't suspect that he ever wanted to kill him)

If the person said: "If I were here to kill you, I wouldn't have knocked on your door."

This condition states that "in the event that I was here to kill you, I wouldn't have knocked on your door." Despite in the present he is not there to kill him, the way he uses this conditional states that he would never have knocked on the door if he was here to kill person B, which is false.

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