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I wonder what is the exact meaning of the sentence 'I am going to school.'

I have known that it is usually used to mean 'I'm going to go to school.', not 'I'm on my way to school. Am I wrong? Can the sentence be used to mean two thngs?

Then the following dialogue has two meanings?

Jane : Where are you going ? = Where are you on your way? or Where are you going to go?

Tom : I am going to school. = I am on my way to school. or I am going to go to school.

I would appreciate your help. ^^
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In your dialogue, with a high probability Jane saw Tom in his school uniform and a bag with him while he was walking on the road or passing near her. So, she recognised him and asked: " Hey boy, where are you going at this right moment ? And boy answers:" I am going to school right now, at this right moment." Then they say good bye to each other and again he walks to the school.

Of course we don't say the sentences in pink in a conversation . I just wanted you to give the meaning. Saying "going to go" sounds more planned and it will sound funny if you see a boy in his school uniforms and with a bag saying " I am going to go school while he is on his way to school. Emotion: smile
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Hi Brightsun, and welcome to the forums.

I'm not sure I understand your question.

Where are you going (right now)?
I'm going home.
I'm going to the library.
I'm going to school.

All of these are fine. They all mean "I am on my way to..."

What are you going to do tomorrow?
Tomorrow, I'm going to go visit my sister.
Tomorrow, I'm going to school like every Wednesday, of course.
Tomorrow, I'm going to clean my house.
Tomorrow, I'm not going to do anything! I'm not going to go anywhere or do anything! I'm just going to relax.

"Go to" has two meanings - one means to travel to, and one means to plan to.

Does that help you at all?
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Thank you so much! ^^ but I couldn't get what I wanted.

Jane : Where are you going now?

Tom : I am going to school.

In this dialogue, Does ' I am going to school.' mean ' I am on my way to school.' ?

Right?

-------------------------

If they say like this,

Jane : Where will you go?

Tom : I am going to school.

In this dialogue, Can ' I am going to school.' mean ' I will go to school.' ?

Right?
 BarbaraPA's reply was promoted to an answer.
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BrightsunThank you so much! ^^ but I couldn't get what I wanted.

Jane : Where are you going now?

Tom : I am going to school.

In this dialogue, Does ' I am going to school.' mean ' I am on my way to school.' ?

Right?

Right. You are using present progressive to talk about something happening now, at this moment. That's one of its usages.
BrightsunIf they say like this,

Jane : Where will you go?

Tom : I am going to school.

In this dialogue, Can ' I am going to school.' mean ' I will go to school.' ?

Right?
Present progressive can also be used to express a future action. But if someone asked me "Where will you go?", I would say "I will go to school", using the verb form from the question. The point is that you use "will" when you're talking about something that was not previously planned, and you use pres. progressive and "going to" form when you're talking about a planned action. "Going to" might be a bit confusing, but it can be followed by any verb, so you can say "I'm going to go to school" ("going to" form) and it's not the same structure as "I'm going to school" (which is present progressive).

Hope this helps.