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I am me or I am I?
Which one is correct?
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Comments  (Page 3) 
hello?
If this is Biblical (Exodus, I believe, when Moses finds the burning bush), the quote is: I am who I am; I will be who I will be. In other words: אני מי שאני, אני יהיה אשר אהיה.
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Belly
Okay, but I think grammatically speaking, the I am ME should be more correct than I am I. How can it be more informal than the later?


You might have it round the wrong way. A case could be made that "I am I" is technically more correct than "I am me", but in practice "I am me" is perfectly OK to almost everybody (I would suggest). If "I am me" is "more informal", then it's more informal relative to something that sets a very high level of formality and "correctness" -- so in absolute terms, "I am me" is not really that informal.
I have a question in relation to this.

Specifically in the context, "I am _ and she is _," what would be/sound more proper to an institution of learning?
Personally (and possibly just because it's aesthetically pleasing) I'm leaning towards "I am me and she is she," but since I'm putting the two statements side-by-side, I feel as though it might sound unbalanced.

To clarify, the options are as follows, in descending order of my preference:
"I am me and she is she."
"I am I and she is she."
"I am me and she is her."
"I am I and she is her."
AnonymousSpecifically in the context, "I am _ and she is _," what would be/sound more proper to an institution of learning?
An institution of learning cannot hear, so it's a moot point how anything might sound to it. Emotion: sad

Anyway, in what possible context, whether in an institution of learning or elsewhere, would anyone need to express such tautological gibberish? What is the point of saying "That car is that car" or "That desk is that desk"?

Of course, if you read the whole thread you'll see that it was a very rare scenario that led the OP to ask about this in the first place, so if you really have such a rare case, use these preferred forms: I am me; he is him; she is her; we are us; etc.

CJ
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Oh, East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet...
Mister MicawberOh, East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet...
It depends on your definition of 'are'.
There is no there, there.
CalifJimuse these preferred forms: I am me; he is him; she is her; we are us; etc.
I was simplifying for the sake of the example. The full sentence is "I'm still _ and she's still _." In other words, "neither of us have changed." Regardless of why I want to know (I'm curious.) or how logically sound my example is, could you explain why those forms are preferred for that situation?
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Anonymouswhy those forms are preferred for that situation?
In modern English pronouns are seldom chosen on the basis of Latin grammar (where the subject case is used after a linking verb) except in the most formal circumstances. In modern English the object case has more or less become the post-verbal case.

Before the verb: I, we, he, ...
After the verb: me, us, him, ...

Hence, I am me, It was me, ...

CJ
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