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I am me or I am I?
Which one is correct?
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Strictly speaking, "I am I."

More commonly used is "I am me."
Hi,

I wouldn't say that either is a very common statement.

In what context would you want to say this?

Best wishes, Clive
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When to use each one? Why me is not grammatically correct, but me?

For example, this context: I say I am ____ and you are you. We don't get in each other's way!
The objective case is used in the post-verbal position, even if the verb is to be.
Only the most formal contexts would require the nominative case.

The reflexive can also be used.

I am me.
This is me.
It's me.

I've got to be me.
I have to be myself.
He isn't himself today.

CJ
BellyWhen to use each one? Why me is not grammatically correct, but me?

For example, this context: I say I am __ and you are you. We don't get in each other's way!

I say I am me and you are you. We don't get in each other's way!

Am I right to conclude that the above sentence is natural?
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But didn't Yoong Liat say strictly speaking, I am I is right?
BellyBut didn't Yoong Liat say strictly speaking, I am I is right?

Yes, I did. But 'strictly speaking' doesn't mean that "I am I" is commonly used. "I am I" is used in formal situations. "I am me" is the more common version.

I'm reproducing my first reply for your information.

Strictly speaking, "I am I."
More commonly used is "I am me."
If I said, in some conversation with my colleagues or friends, "I am I", they would think that I was putting on airs.
If I said it in the company of people who didn't know me better, they would think that I was more stuck up than someone wearing a very starched bow-tie and top-hat, with his snoot pointed heavenwards and his eyes gazing down on them, poor mortals.
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