+0
Is the given sentence correct?
I assure that I will do your work earnestly and there will be no documentary problem as far as my deal is concerned.
Comments  
Help, please.
.
I assure you that I will do my work earnestly and there will be no documentation problem as far as my end of the deal is concerned.
.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Mister Micawber.
I assure you that I will do my work earnestly and there will be no documentation problem as far as my end of the deal is concerned.
Thank you, Mr Micawber.

Is there no way that the word documentary can be used. I think according to the below definition 1, it is permissible to use documentary in the given context.  Perhaps, it isn't not idiomatic, that's why you changed it to documentation.

1documentary
1: being or consisting of documents : contained or certified in writing <documentary evidence>
2: of, relating to, or employing documentation in literature or art ; broadly : factual, objective <a documentary film of the war>
[M-W's Col. Dic.]
.
It is indeed not idiomatic; definition #1 is now confused in most readers' minds with #2. However, I am now confused about your intended meaning.

In revising, I though that you meant that there would be no problems in documenting (i.e. producing written proof or documentation) the work. However, I now understand that you may have meant no problems in producing or manipulating documents generally.

In the former case, use this: there will be no documentation problem.
In the latter case, use this: there will be no problem with documents.
.
Mister Micawber.

It is indeed not idiomatic; definition #1 is now confused in most readers' minds with #2. However, I am now confused about your intended meaning.

In revising, I though that you meant that there would be no problems in documenting (i.e. producing written proof or documentation) the work. However, I now understand that you may have meant no problems in producing or manipulating documents generally.

In the former case, use this: there will be no documentation problem.
In the latter case, use this: there will be no problem with documents.
My intended meaning was no problems in producing or manipulating documents, as you have accurately guessed. Okay, it's not idiomatic. But is its use forbidden in any case? An English speaker can say it's not idiomatic but for others it will serve the purpose, don't you think?

Thank you for the help.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
.
Few things are 'forbidden', but 'No'. It opens the meaning of the sentence to confusion and misinterpretataion. You are missing the point: idiom is good and should be adhered to-- that is how we communicate most successfully.
.
Mister Micawber.
Few things are 'forbidden', but 'No'.  It opens the meaning of the sentence to confusion and misinterpretataion.  You are missing the point: idiom is good and should be adhered to -- that is how we communicate most successfully.
Are you talking about an idiom in general or are you specifically talking about the idiom described above (documents, documentation, etc) ?

If you specifically talked about the idiom (such as documents, documentation), then I would have written: idiom is good thing and should be adhered to. Is my way also correct?

Thank you for the help.
.
I'm talking about idiomatic expressions (phrases used frequently and commonly in any register), not idioms (groups of words having a different meaning from the sum of the meanings of the individual words). This latter is often too casual for some registers (like written business English). Unfortunately, the words (idiom, idiomatic) are used with more than one meaning.
.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.