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Dear all,

The other day I saw in a video a person asked a non-native YouTube teacher to translate a sentence from his mother tongue into English. The teacher translated the sentence as "I came here because Alex told me to". I think why didn't he write " I have come here because Alex told me to". I'd like to get your opinion on this.
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cat navy 425 Dear all,
The other day I saw in a video a person asked a non-native YouTube teacher to translate a sentence from his mother tongue into English. The teacher translated the sentence as "I came here because Alex told me to". I think why didn't he write " I have come here because Alex told me to". I'd like to get your opinion on this.

Both replies are good English. The setting will determine which is the more suitable, if indeed one does turn out to be better than the other in that setting.

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cat navy 425The teacher translated the sentence as "I came here because Alex told me to". I think wonder why he didn't he write " I have come here because Alex told me to".

Both are fine.

As long as there is no mention of a time, both tenses are usually possible.

CJ

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Thanks a lot.
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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CJ Sir, Thanks a lot for your valuable reply.

CJ Sir, I wrote, "I think why didn't he write". You corrected it as "I wonder why he didn't write". Sir, I wrote so because sometimes I mistake some questions for an embedded question.

I'd like to ask you one more question. Please see the sentence "Please tell me whether there is any difference in their meaning". Here I am unsure whether there is a full stop or a question mark is needed at the end of the sentence, that is after 'meaning'. I'd like to get your valuable opinion on this.

Thank you.

cat navy 425I wrote, "I think why didn't he write". ... I wrote so it that way because sometimes I mistake some questions for an embedded question.

OK. An embedded question (also called an indirect question) always occurs inside a bigger sentence. That bigger sentence can be a statement or a question.

In most cases it's a matter of learning how the main verb works. Either it takes a that-clause which is not a question or it takes an embedded question. Or it might allow both.

'think' doesn't allow any kind of question unless it's a quoted direct question.

1) I think why he didn't write ... .
2) I think why didn't he write ... .
3) I think "Why didn't he write ... ?"

1) has the word order of an embedded question, but that's not the problem. The problem is that the verb 'think' doesn't take embedded questions.
2) has the word order of a direct question, but that's not the problem. The problem is that the verb think doesn't take direct questions unless they are quoted.
3) is OK because it has a direct question which is quoted.


The easiest way I found to correct your sentence was to give you a verb that could take an embedded question. "wonder" is the perfect verb for that sentence because it almost always takes an embedded question. "wonder who ...", "wonder what ...", "wonder whether ...", "wonder how ...", etc.

"wonder" is a really useful verb. You should get to know it well. Emotion: smile

cat navy 425Please tell me whether there is any difference in their meaning.

'tell me' is an imperative (a command), not a question, so you don't want a question mark there. It should be just as you wrote it above. You did the right thing. Emotion: yes

Note the difference:

Please tell me ... ... ... .
Could you tell me ... ... ... ?

By the way, "tell me" also takes embedded questions.

CJ

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CJ Sir, I understand now. Thanks a million for this valuable note.