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1) You could imagine sentence (a) (being??) uttered by someone consulting their diary and seeing that tomorrow's page is blank.

2) I can imagine him (being??) really angry.

3) I can't imagine elephants (being??) able to fly.

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/imagine says the verb "imagine" is sometimes followed by the ing-form of another verb: She imagined herself sitting in her favourite chair back home. So my question is: do we need "being" in (1) (using the passive voice), (2) and (3) (both using an adjective)?

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Rizan Malik1) You could imagine sentence (a) (being??) uttered by someone consulting their diary and seeing that tomorrow's page is blank.

1a) You could imagine a sentence uttered by someone consulting their diary and seeing that tomorrow's page is blank.

You visualize the sentence written down on a piece of paper.

1b) You could imagine a sentence being uttered by someone consulting their diary and seeing that tomorrow's page is blank.

You can hear the sentence as it is spoken (with expression such as the tone of voice.)

Rizan Malik2) I can imagine him (being??) really angry.

I would use either "getting" or "being."

Rizan Malik3) I can't imagine elephants (being??) able to fly.

These are more natural to me.

3) I can't imagine elephants that are able to fly.
3) I can't imagine flying elephants.
3) I can't imagine winged elephants.

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Rizan MalikYou could imagine a sentence (a) (being??) uttered by ...
do we need "being" in (1) (using the passive voice)

'being' is optional here, but you're right that when it is used, it creates a passive voice construction.

Rizan Malik(2) and (3) (both using an adjective)?

Yes. For most situations you need a verb in those. Here 'being' acts like a linking verb.
him being angry ~ he is angry
elephants being able to fly ~ elephants are able to fly

You may see this construction without the linking verb in more literary contexts.

CJ

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Comments  

Sorry to confuse you both. In (1), by "sentence (a)", I meant a specific sentence that has already been mentioned in the dialogue before and that was marked as (a).

1) You could imagine that sentence (being??) uttered by someone consulting their diary and seeing that tomorrow's page is blank.

Here the speaker is talking about imagining/visualizing a particular sentence mentioned earlier in the discussion.


Isn't the part "that sentence uttered by someone..." a passive construction? If so, don't we need "being" before "uttered"? (as in "that sentence is uttered by someone")


Also does the verb "imagine" work like the verb "see"? I mean, can I say:

I saw him being really angry.

I can imagine him being really angry is correct as you said.

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Rizan Malik1) You could imagine that sentence (being??) uttered by someone consulting their diary and seeing that tomorrow's page is blank.
Here the speaker is talking about imagining/visualizing a particular sentence mentioned earlier in the discussion.

I would include "being", but omitting it would not make the sentence ungrammatical.

Rizan MalikIsn't the part "that sentence uttered by someone..." a passive construction?

Any past participle can suggest the passive voice when associated with a preceding noun, so I think it's OK to call it passive in nature. However, it's not truly passive voice unless it is accompanied by some form of the auxiliary be.

Rizan MalikIsn't the part "that sentence uttered by someone..." a passive construction? If so, don't we need "being" before "uttered"? (as in "that sentence is uttered by someone")

I do think it's better with "being", but grammatically it's not absolutely necessary.

Rizan Malik

Also does the verb "imagine" work like the verb "see"? I mean, can I say:

I saw him being really angry.

I can imagine him being really angry is correct as you said.

I've never thought of it that way, but it seems that 'see' and 'imagine' can work in the same way. It's just that 'see' also allows the non-ing form, and 'imagine' doesn't. And 'see' only rarely pairs with 'be' or 'being'. We'd more often say the more natural "I saw him when he was really angry" than "I saw him being really angry", which is less natural (but grammatical).

CJ