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Consider this sentence, please:

I can't wait to gobble up all that nostalgia and so much more, once Disney+hotstar releases tomorrow!

For the above sentence, are both of the following interpretations possible?

1) I can't wait [tomorrow] to gobble up all that nostalgia and so much more, once Disney+hotstar releases tomorrow! (the underlined clause modifies the main verb "wait")

2) I can't wait [now] to gobble up all that nostalgia and so much more, once Disney+hotstar releases tomorrow! (the underlined clause modifies the verb "to gobble up")

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Rizan Malik2) I can't wait [now] to gobble up all that nostalgia and so much more, once Disney+hotstar releases tomorrow! (the underlined clause modifies the verb "to gobble up")

Essentially it's this one (though I'm not sure I would use the term "modifies").

Interpretation (1) does not make proper sense.

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Rizan MalikFor the above sentence, are both of the following interpretations possible?

No. Only the second.

I can't wait (The writer is speaking of the present time)

to gobble up all that nostalgia ... (The writer is speaking of what will occur at a future time.)

once Disney+hotstar releases tomorrow! (This is the time that the event will happen. )

Another way to write it:

I can't wait until tomorrow when Disney+hotstar releases! I will gobble up all that nostalgia and so much more.

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Comments  

Thank you. I think the original sentence sounds a little odd. Actually, I mistakenly forgot to write an object for the verb "release." "Disney+hotstar" or simply "Hotstar" is a streaming service. So with those corrections, the second interpretation (the correct interpretation, as you said) is:

3) I can't wait [now] to gobble up all that nostalgia and so much more, once "Disney+hotstar" releases the movie tomorrow! (the underlined clause modifies the verb "to gobble up")

GPY(though I'm not sure I would use the term "modifies").

Isn't the underlined clause in sentence 3) above an adverbial clause of time modifying the verb "to gobble up"?

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Rizan Malik3) above an adverbial clause of time modifying the verb "to gobble up"?

I really don't care for the label "modifying" To modify means to adjust the meaning. e.g.

He walked quickly.
He walked slowly.
He walked briskly.

The adverbs change the meaning of "walk" in that we can visualize a different type of action. That is a meaningful use of "modification."

But the clause (once "Disney+hotstar" releases the movie tomorrow!) does not really function that same way. It "modifies" the entire clause or sentence, not just the verb.

https://parentingpatch.com/adjunct-adverbial-english-grammar/

Currently, these optional clauses and phrases are labeled "adjuncts." They are adverbial in that they provide information concerning frequency, time, manner, or place.


Adverbials are grammatically far more versatile and complex than nouns or adjectives.

If you want to explore more, here is a reference:

https://www.lexico.com/grammar/word-classes/adverbs