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Who would you prefer to edit your writing: a non-native speaker of English who is a Professor of English at an Indian (or a Belgian) university, or a monolingual Brit or American who left school with no qualifications at the age of 15?
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Comments  (Page 3) 
It would depend on what I needed editing.
AnonymousIt would depend on what I needed editing.
<thumbs up>

MrP
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More to say? Or do we all need to guess on what it would depend?
Don't you think that the question itself is biased? Now why would anybody want to go to a 15 year old native english speaker, also a school drop out, instead of going to a prof for editing? How does it matter which country he is from as long as he is qualified to teach English? We are not definitely talking about spoken english but written. So ,what is the big deal of being a native or a non-native speaker as long as the qualifications prove that he can write english well (which an english professor definitely would.)?
<Now why would anybody want to go to a 15 year old native english speaker, also a school drop out, instead of going to a prof for editing? >

The question was first asked by an Indian professor of English. He was so pis*ed at the way native speakers, of whatever educational background, are cited as greater expert users than people such as he. He detests the term, native speaker.
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Of course, he's an "expert user" too, in his own first language. So the term doesn't imply an absolute hierarchy.

In practical terms, I still prefer Anon's response: if you were sensible, you would ask the professor about some things, and the 15-year-old about others. (You might even ask both.)

MrP
>> In practical terms, I still prefer Anon's response: if you were sensible, you would ask the professor about some things, and the 15-year-old about others. (You might even ask both.) <<

Well, whatever it is, it's going to be a humdinger book, if you have such a dismal choice for editor. I suppose the publisher is a dead chimpanzee, and the distributor a horse?
<In practical terms, I still prefer Anon's response: if you were sensible, you would ask the professor about some things, and the 15-year-old about others. (You might even ask both.)>

Why would you want to ask the professor about some things and not all things?
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<Well, whatever it is, it's going to be a humdinger book, if you have such a dismal choice for editor.>

Why dismal?
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