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Hi teachers,

I don't know which tense I should use. Assume today is still here, 10 am. I am not in the office. Some customer called me on my cellphone because of work related issue. I explained: I'm sorry I didn't go to work today.

My dictionary interpreter gives me this sentence:

I'm sorry I didn't go to work today.

From what I learnt in the grammar book, if today is not finished, use "present prefect tense". If I use haven't, that means I might go later. If I use I don't, that would probably mean I never go to work.

Could you help me with this sentence?

Thanks

Tinanam
Comments  
This depends on what you plan to do with the rest of the day. If you have taken the day off, just simply let him know that you have taken the day off and will return tomorrow. If you are still at home for personal reasons and plan to go back to the office, you may say " I am sorry, I have not arrived my office yet / I am not at my office at the moment but I will be back to my office later on today".
Dear Dimsumexpress,

Thank you for your help.

1. To a customer I work for, can I say: I won't be at the office today.

2. To a supervisor, can I say: I have to take leave for personal reasons. Is there a natural way to write an email to your supervisor acknowleging her of my imminent leave.

3. I heard of "call in sick", does that mean the staff actually call the office or they send an email to the office?

Thank you.

Tinanam
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tinanam01021. To a customer I work for, can I say: I won't be at the office today.
There are certain negative words clients don't want to hear; words such as "I can't", "I don't" and "I won't" should be avoided in correspondence with clients. Personally, being a professional over 20 years, if I am taking a few days off and a client calls me on my cellphone, I would accommodate him on the phone. But if that matter requires more assistance, I would tell him: "I am currently away from my office, but I will return to my office tomorrow".

2. To a supervisor, can I say: I have to take leave for personal reasons. Is there a natural way to write an email to your supervisor acknowleging her of my imminent leave.

In the U.S., a "leave" means an extended time off (otherwise known as Leave Of Absence), i.e. a sick leave which is typically a month or longer and is usually reserved for serious illness, or a maternity leave for pragnant employees. A request for la eave should be presented in an official meno or email. Usually, a few days off for family matters or for personal reasons is not a problem here. I am not familiar with the Chinese office culture, so I won't know how your supervisor will react when you ask for a "leave". If you must request a leave, because of the time your supervisor is without you doing the work, it would seem resonable to state your reason(s) to let him know why the time off.

3. I heard of "call in sick", does that mean the staff actually call the office or they send an email to the office?

Yes, if one wakes up with a fever, or he has a nasty hang-over from having a few drinks too many last night, he is likely to "call in sick".Emotion: winkI never heard of anyone calling in sick by email. Though, it is a good idea.Emotion: big smile

Hi Dimsumexpress,

Thank you for the reply. I'm not taking leave. I'd like to know how to write them.

I'd like to ask you about this:

The boss (the employer who runs the business) > My superior's superior > My superior> me.

I don't know how to use "boss", "supervisor", "superintendent" that I heard all the time? I heard my superior say her boss wants her to do something, and I thought it was the boss, but it is not. It's the her superior. Could you explain to me?

Thank you.

Tinanam
A boss is a general term referring to someone with authority who is in charge of an operation or business. He may also be the owner.

A supervisor is someone whose main function is to oversees a group of workers, making sure they are on time, showing up for work, following the company guidelines and sustaining a specified productivity.

A manager is someone similar to a "boss", except it sound more professional.

A superior is someone who is directly above you in ranking at a work place, typically referring to your immediate supervisor. This term seems to be getting less used these days

Then, there is someone called a "lead" (leader) who reports to the supervisor and functions as a liason between the workers and the management.

Does this help?
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Hi Dimsumexpress,

Thank you very much.

The chart:

The owner (boss) > Kate, customer service officer > Lisa, customer service executive > me, customer service staff supporting sales persons and Lisa.

In this case, Kate would be the supervisor, and she would call Lisa her subordinate. Lisa would call Kate her boss. Is it correct?

Do I refer Lisa as my supervisor, or Kate?

I'm sorry for a long thread.

Tinanam
Tina,
Have you heard of "organization chart" ? The way you had it is confusing. If Lisa is an officer and you are the service executive, by the sound of the title, it would seem to me you are her superior. So without knowing how your organization works, I assume the chart looks like this:

Kate -onwer
|
|
Lisa - customer officer
|
|
Tina - customer executive
tinanam0102In this case, Kate would be the supervisor, and she would call Lisa her subordinate. Lisa would call Kate her boss. Is it correct?

In a nutshell, it is correct, except Kate is more than a supervisor, she is also the owner as well as the boss.