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Hello Teachres

Please look at the three sentences below.
[1] I don't like that he is with a woman.
[2] I don't like it that he is with a woman.
[3] I don't like it when he is with a woman.
Which sounds natural and which sounds unnatural to you?
If two or more sound natural, is there any difference in the sense and the usage?

paco

[PS] I corrected a careless mistake in [3] after Mic's pointing out it.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Hello MrP

Thank you for the confirmation. It's difficult for me to get what verb requires "it" and what not.

paco
Dear paco;
I have a question.
“I don't like it that he is with a woman. “ Could this mean, for instance, “I don’t like the fact that he is with a woman now”?
Likewise,
“I don't like it when he is with a woman.” ? “I don’t like his attitude when he is with a woman.”

Then I don’t know how the sentence “I don’t like that he is with a woman” works out.
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Hello Infinity
"I don't like it that he is with a woman." ? "I don’t like the fact that he is with a woman now."
"I don't like it when he is with a woman." ? "I don’t like his attitude when he is with a woman."

I'm inclined to agree to your opinion. But I'm not sure. No grammar books and no dictionaries give clear explanations about this. Let's wait for native speakers' opinions.

"I don't like that he is with a woman" would be ungrammatical, though some native speakers say it to mean "I don't like it that he is with a woman".

paco
Sorry, I have not been following the thread closely, but with regard to the last two posts:

"I don't like him when he is with a woman." ? "I don’t like his attitude when he is with a woman."

The 'it' cannot be extended to refer to his attitude, as far as I interpret the sentence.
Out of curiosity, can someone provide a context for the sentence:
"I don't like it when he's with a woman"?
I have some ideas, but I'd like to see yours first. Emotion: smile
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Dear MM;
Does the ‘it’ have the same meaning as ‘it’ in “He doesn’t like it when someone calls him Larry”?

Also, I perfectly understand that the ‘it’ doesn’t refer to ‘his attitude’. Then, to me, “I don’t like it when he is with a woman” means something like “I don’t like my life (or myself) when he is with a woman.”
It seems to me that both or all of these 'it's (if I am clear on which 'it's i which sentences we are speaking of) refer to the situation which the speaker will behold or is beholding or has beheld:

It = someone calling him Larry
It = his being with a woman

It just seems to be an anticipatory 'it' for the clause. (Pardon me if I am off topic or redundant-- as I said, I have not been following the development of this thread closely.)
I think the construction with "it" may be a "Germanic" (as in Germanic languages, Dutch, German & English) habit or vestige. They use it in German, the "announce" the following clause with a neutral pronoun, which in fact encompasses all the following clause.
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Out of curiosity, can someone provide a context for the sentence:
"I don't like it when he's with a woman"?


"I don't like it when he's with a woman. He puts on that sympathetic voice and pretends to be really interested in chocolate and makes annoying noises when someone mentions cream cakes. When he's with me, he's fine. We can sit back and talk about football. But when he's with a woman – {pass-the-sick-bag gesture}."

'it' here = 'the situation as a whole'

MrP
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