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Hello Teachres

Please look at the three sentences below.
[1] I don't like that he is with a woman.
[2] I don't like it that he is with a woman.
[3] I don't like it when he is with a woman.
Which sounds natural and which sounds unnatural to you?
If two or more sound natural, is there any difference in the sense and the usage?

paco

[PS] I corrected a careless mistake in [3] after Mic's pointing out it.
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Comments  
I think you left a 'he' out of #3, Paco.

If I have to choose, I'll choose #3 (as amended), with #2 second, and #1 third. They all have the same meaning, for which I'd say 'I don't like his being with a woman'-- or actually, 'I don't like her being with a man'.
Hello MrMicawber

Thank you for pointing the error. I corrected it.

Somehow I feel a difference between "when" (#3) and "that" (#2 and #1). "When" seems to imply his being with a woman is a temporary state, but "that" implies it is rather a permanent state. Am I wrong?

paco

[PS] As a second thought, I feel "when" doesn't necessarily imply he is now with a woman. But "that" implies he lives with a woman now.
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#s 1 and 2 are also read that way, but I didn't take them that way-- I presumed that you were presenting three ways of saying the same thing. Of course, 'when' is a temporal conjunction.

PS: I wish you wouldn't edit while I'm replying-- it's disconcerting. Re your PS, the same comment applies.
Sorry and thanks. So do you mean there could be some difference in the usage between "that" and "when", though my examples are not appropriate to illustrate the difference?

paco
Sure there are, and your examples are fine. I was pursuing 'naturalness'.
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Thank you.

Frankly I'm not so much acquainted with this construct of . I'll learn more about it by myself, and I'll ask you again when I find something I can't get.

paco
Hello Teachers
Please look at the three sentences below.
[1] I don't like that he is with a woman.
[2] I don't like it that he is with a woman.
[3] I don't like it when he is with a woman.
Which sounds natural and which sounds unnatural to you?
If two or more sound natural, is there any difference in the sense and the usage?


A Japanese scholar told me that #1 is not correct grammatically. He said "I don't like" requires a preparatory "it". Is it true?

paco
Well, #1 does sound a bit strange to me, now you mention it. I assumed it was a non-BrE dialect...

MrP
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