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i dont remember hearing...
i heard that today, but i dont unerstand this scentnece, i thought its correct to say:
"i dont rememer i have heard this/about it
hearing is present progressive.

one more q:

i know a subject called "story telling" what is it? how is it different from noral speaking
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Hi Picnic:

1) I don't remember hearing the news about the election.

This is an example of using the present participle of a verb where a noun or pronoun would be in a sentence. It is called a gerund, and it is very common.

Story-telling is the act of telling a story. It is often for fun or amusement.

At camp after dinner, Dad entertained us with his story-telling.
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ty for your reply!

1.
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First, is it correct to say "I have heard that today"? just to check my understanding....

But, of-course i can say "I don't remember I have heard the news"
or cant?

I dont understand it, and its hard because its different and sounds weird in my language, if you can explain the gerund for me, I'll appreciate.

most of the times, if you know what i mean, I can see the usage of story telling in history documentations on TV, where the presenter use the present simple (also the progressive ) rather than the past simple or perfect which i assume are more suitable.

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what about; "I saw him wearing" ??
PicnicFirst, is it correct to say "I have heard that today"?
No, don't use the present perfect with a specific time reference.

a) I have heard that. (sometime in the past)
b) I heard that today. (specifically today)
Picnic"I don't remember I have heard the news"
I don't remember if I heard the news.

The English verb has 4 parts - infinitive, past, present participle and past participle.
The present participle can be used in several ways:
1) to form the progressive tenses.
2) as an adjective
3) as a noun (here it is called a gerund)

Here is an example of each, using the verb "run"

I was running down the street when I fell. (past progressive tense)
The mother tried to catch the running child. (adjective)
Running as fast as possible, he reached the bus stop just in time. (adjective phrase)

Running for the office of president is exhausting. (noun - gerund)
Picnicwhat about; "I saw him wearing a polka-dot tie" ??
This is a little trickier. I've seen such patterns interpreted either as an adjective phrase, (wearing a polka-dot tie) modifying the pronoun "him," or a gerund phrase, direct object of the verb see, with "him" as the subject of the gerund. Most vote for the gerund.

Regards,
A-Emotion: stars
AlpheccaStarsNo, don't use the present perfect with a specific time reference.

a) I have heard that. (sometime in the past)
b) I heard that today. (specifically today)
Ok, thank you, I understand it now...
AlpheccaStars
Picnic"I don't remember I have heard the news"
I don't remember if I heard the news.
I don't remember if I have heard the news. right?
AlpheccaStarsThe English verb has 4 parts - infinitive, past, present participle and past participle.
The present participle can be used in several ways:
1) to form the progressive tenses.
2) as an adjective
3) as a noun (here it is called a gerund)

Here is an example of each, using the verb "run"
I was running down the street when I fell. (past progressive tense)
The mother tried to catch the running child. (adjective)
Running as fast as possible, he reached the bus stop just in time. (adjective phrase)
Running for the office of president is exhausting. (noun - gerund)
what is participle?? Emotion: sad if i will know, i would understand what you wrote
AlpheccaStars
Picnicwhat about; "I saw him wearing a polka-dot tie" ??
This is a little trickier. I've seen such patterns interpreted either as an adjective phrase, (wearing a polka-dot tie) modifying the pronoun "him," or a gerund phrase, direct object of the verb see, with "him" as the subject of the gerund. Most vote for the gerund.

Regards,
A- Emotion: star s
Yes i think its the gerund too..".I saw that he wore a polka-dot tie"
can i say "he was wearing"?

Thank you!
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Picnic"I saw him wearing a polka-dot tie"
I believe "wearing" is a present participle making up the adverbial phrase "wearing a polka-dot tie" modifying "him".

The verb " remember" is always followed by a present partciple (often mistaken for gerund).
I remember reminding him to be on time for the meeting.
i still dont understand you...please help
I saw him wearing a polka-dot tie. (wearing is a present participle here)

Some other examples

He kept saying it over and over again. (the present participle saying here modifies "kept")

He loves swimming. (swimming here is a gerund)

In a sentence containg a gerund/participle it helps to detach the participle/gerund part from the main verb and if the sentence still makes sense then you know you're dealing with a gerund rather than a present participle.

Saying it over and over again he kept. (this doesn't make any sense)

Wearing a polka-dot tie, I saw him (this has the meaning like you (not him) wore a polka-dot tie; it differs from the original meaning)

Swimming is an activity that he loves. (this makes sense so it must be a gerund; I added the one activity part but this is ok)
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Picnicwhat is participle?? Emotion: sad if i will know, i would understand what you wrote
Every English verb has 4 parts, for example, the 3 verbs drink, go, look:

Drink, go, look (infinitive, the dictionary entry)
Drank, went, looked ( the simple past)
drunk, gone, looked (the past participle)
drinking, going, looking (the present participle)

The past participle is irregular in the strong verbs.You have to memorize it.

In regular (weak) verbs, it is the same as the simple past.
The present participle is the verb+ing. It is always regular.
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