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Hi,
I've read some threads about "sick", but I still don't understand if "I feel sick" is used in the US. In the UK it should mean "I'm going to vomit", is it used the same way in the US?

I feel sick = ?

And another thing... What's the most common way to say you think you're going to vomit, in the US? I feel sick, I feel sick to my stomach, I'm going to throw up... ??? And is the verb "to puke" in use?

Thanks in advance and sorry for my disgusting thread about vomit, LOL Emotion: smile
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KooyeenIn the UK it should mean "I'm going to vomit", is it used the same way in the US?

I feel sick = ?

And another thing... What's the most common way to say you think you're going to vomit, in the US? I feel sick, I feel sick to my stomach, I'm going to throw up... ??? And is the verb "to puke" in use?

Thanks in advance and sorry for my disgusting thread about vomit, LOL Emotion: smile

More often than not, in BrE, "I feel sick" is non-predictive. Sometimes I feel a bit sick on the train in the morning, when the chap next to me fiddles with his nose, for instance; but I don't intend to vomit. It can simply describe a faint internal discomfort.

"I'm going to be sick", on the other hand, does mean "I'm going to vomit".

MrP

PS: "In the UK it should mean" → "In the UK it would mean".

Comments  
As an AmE speaker:

I feel sick can mean I may vomit or I feel ill (in some way) or I feel unhappy.

There are many euphemisms and metaphoric ways of expressing the first (my favorite: 'laugh at the carpet'), but in mixed company, I usually opt for throw up. Puke is (to me) only among the boys.
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Ok, thanks MM. Emotion: smile
I still don't understand if "I feel sick" is used in the US. In the UK it should mean "I'm going to vomit", is it used the same way in the US?
No, it's not used the same way in the US. It's not that specific in the US. It just means you are not well, usually because your stomach is upset, but it could be because you feel a bad headache, a cold, or the flu coming on. US sick covers all of the UK uses of ill. If you're (US) sick in bed, it doesn't mean you've thrown up in bed.

CJ
 MrPedantic's reply was promoted to an answer.
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