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Hi guys,

I would just like to ask what is wrong with " I go to buy something". I know it sounds wrong but I want a clear grammatical explanation to it.

I think the closest substitute which I can think of is "I am buying something" but I dont want it to mean that. How can I express, in proper sentence, "I am in the process of walking to the place which i want to buy something"

And I dont think "I am going to buy something" can represent what I want to express because "going to" mean "will" but you havent actually started walking.

I know this is confusing, or perhaps, it only confuses me. Can someone help me?
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Hi,

I would just like to ask what is wrong with " I go to buy something". I know it sounds wrong but I want a clear grammatical explanation to it.

It's not grammatically wrong. Present tense is used to talk about habitual activities, so if I asked you 'Why do you go to the store every day?', you might answer 'I go to buy something. But obviously, you need the right context and it's not the kind of thing you'd say very often.

I think the closest substitute which I can think of is "I am buying something" but I dont want it to mean that. How can I express, in proper sentence, "I am in the process of walking to the place which i want to buy something" You could say 'I am going to the store to buy something'. The context will usually make clear whether you are talking about a future plan, or whether you are going right now. If I see you walking, I know you are going right now!

And I dont think "I am going to buy something" can represent what I want to express because "going to" mean "will" but you havent actually started walking. Well, if you are 'in the process of walking', that means you are walking.

I'm not sure if I have helped to clarify this for you. If you have any more questions, please write again.

Clive
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I go to buy something is grammatically correct, but it does not sound natural. It is, perhaps, somewhat "elevated" in tone.

There is a definition of off that may express what you want to say; it is also a common usage:

Started on the way; going: <I'm off to see the president.> ---dictionary.com

So you might say, "I'm off to the store" or "I'm off to buy chocolates."

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 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thanks heaps guys.

I appreciate your help. Thanks a lot. I think i get what you mean now.

But , one more question. Does the usage of present tense always occurs in habitual activity?
i think it is better to say "I'm going to buy something."

Thanx, peace out fellows!
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Hi,

Does the usage of present tense always occurs in habitual activity? No. For example, we use it for 'facts', eg 'British people drink a lot of tea'. But it's a good way to begin to learn about it. After that, you can look at the various other aspects.

Best wishes, Clive