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This is from the comedy series of Friends. Rechal explained her escaping from wedding in the following words. Regarding the red line, I always hear I like really freaked out instead of I got really freaked out. Any comment about this?

Oh God... well, it started about a half hour before the wedding. I was in the room where we were keeping all the presents, and I was looking at this gravy boat. This really gorgeous Limoges gravy boat. When all of a sudden I realized- (to the waitress that brought her coffee)Sweet 'n' Lo?-I realized, I realized that I was more turned on by this gravy boat than by Barry! And then I got really freaked out, and that's when it hit me: how much Barry looks like Mr. Potato Head. Y'know, I mean, I always knew looked familiar, but... Anyway, I just had to get out of there, and I started wondering 'Why am I doing this, and who am I doing this for?'. (to Monica) So anyway I just didn't know where to go, and I know that you and I have kinda drifted apart, but you're the only person I knew who lived here in the city.
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Hi,

This is from the comedy series of Friends. Rechal explained her escaping from wedding in the following words. Regarding the red line, I always hear I like really freaked out instead of I got really freaked out. Any comment about this?

Oh God... well, it started about a half hour before the wedding. I was in the room where we were keeping all the presents, and I was looking at this gravy boat. This really gorgeous Limoges gravy boat. When all of a sudden I realized- (to the waitress that brought her coffee)Sweet 'n' Lo?-I realized, I realized that I was more turned on by this gravy boat than by Barry! And then I got really freaked out, and that's when it hit me: how much Barry looks like Mr. Potato Head. Y'know, I mean, I always knew looked familiar, but... Anyway, I just had to get out of there, and I started wondering 'Why am I doing this, and who am I doing this for?'. (to Monica) So anyway I just didn't know where to go, and I know that you and I have kinda drifted apart, but you're the only person I knew who lived here in the city.

You can say 'I freaked out' or 'I got freaked out'. There's very little difference in meaning. Both are very informal English, slang really.

Many young people today have a habit of putting the word 'like' in front of their verbs, as well as in other places in their speech. It really does not add anything to the meaning. eg I like wanted to watch TV, but like I had to do my home work.

Rachel says I freaked out but some people, as I have explained, would say I like freaked out.

Like best wishes, Clive
Hi Clive, so I like think what I like heard should like be I like really freaked out. But how to understand it from the point of view of grammar?

BTW, would you have a look at the red line below?

Like thanks, Osee
CliveHi,

This is from the comedy series of Friends. Rechal explained her escaping from wedding in the following words. Regarding the red line, I always hear I like really freaked out instead of I got really freaked out. Any comment about this?

Oh God... well, it started about a half hour before the wedding. I was in the room where we were keeping all the presents, and I was looking at this gravy boat. This really gorgeous Limoges gravy boat. When all of a sudden I realized- (to the waitress that brought her coffee)Sweet 'n' Lo?-I realized, I realized that I was more turned on by this gravy boat than by Barry! And then I got really freaked out, and that's when it hit me: how much Barry looks like Mr. Potato Head. Y'know, I mean, I always knew looked familiar, but... Anyway, I just had to get out of there, and I started wondering 'Why am I doing this, and who am I doing this for?'. (to Monica) So anyway I just didn't know where to go, and I know that you and I have kinda drifted apart, but you're the only person I knew who lived here in the city.

You can say 'I freaked out' or 'I got freaked out'. There's very little difference in meaning. Both are very informal English, slang really.

Many young people today have a habit of putting the word 'like' in front of their verbs, as well as in other places in their speech. It really does not add anything to the meaning. eg I like wanted to watch TV, but like I had to do my home work. Q: Why do you put like before I here?

Rachel says I freaked out but some people, as I have explained, would say I like freaked out.

Like best wishes, Clive
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Like hi,

Hi Clive, so I like think what I like heard should like be I like really freaked out. But how to understand it from the point of view of grammar? It doesn't serve any real grammatical function. It's just a speech-filler, rather like saying a noise such as 'hmmmm' in the middle of your sentence.

BTW, would you have a look at the red line below?

eg I like wanted to watch TV, but like I had to do my home work. Q: Why do you put like before I here? You can put 'like' pretty well anywhere you want to.

Like thanks, Osee

Like you're like welcome, Clive
Hi Clive,

How about "kind of" and "like" in the following lines?

I kind of forgot it.

I like forgot it.

Can you make any comment about their usages?
>I kind of forgot it. Used by many people.

>I like forgot it. Rare. Used by the minority using "like" everywhereEmotion: sad Both informal.
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whish one is correct:

forget it

or

forget about it
Either one. One may work better than the other, depending on context. How did you want ot use it?

(P.S. - Please start a new thread when you have a new question that isn't related to the original post, okay?)