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I had it up to here with you.

This sentence is often accompanied with a gesture. In the States, for example, a person would say it while holding up his/her hand up to the neck while saying it, with the palm down. What sort of gesture do the English use? What about North America? Russia? India? France? What kinds of gesture are used with equivalent expressions in other parts of the world?

Do you think that cultural background can affect the kind of gesture that goes with this expression?

Looking forward to your illuminating comments

Regards,

Muayad
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Comments  
Hi,

I've had it up to here with you.

This sentence is often accompanied with a gesture. In the States, for example, a person would say it while holding up his/her hand up to the neck while saying it, with the palm down. What sort of gesture do the English use? Probably the same. What about North America? Same. Russia? India? France? What kinds of gesture are used with equivalent expressions in other parts of the world?

Do you think that cultural background can affect the kind of gesture that goes with this expression? I wouldn't be surprised. In some cultures, it may not even be used.

I've learned that in a multi-cultural classroom, you have to be careful with any kind of hand gesture becuase it may give offence to someone from another culture where it has a different meaning.

Even things like nodding the head up and down for 'Yes', side to side for 'No', are not universal. In some cultures, the meanings are reversed.

I would think that people at the United Nations must have to be very careful.

Best wishes, Clive
Muayad JajoWhat sort of gesture do the English use?

A British English speaker would probably position the gesture above the neck – perhaps at the forehead, or just above the hair.

MrP
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CliveEven things like nodding the head up and down for 'Yes', side to side for 'No', are not universal. In some cultures, the meanings are reversed.
Out of curiosity, which cultures do it the opposite way?
Hi again,

Out of curiosity, which cultures do it the opposite way? I can't quite remember. I checked the 'Net, and it says Bulgaria, but I think the people I've encountered were not from there.

Iran? Korea? Can't recall. Perhaps a reader might care to comment further?

Best wishes, Clive
Hmm, I've interacted with a fair number of Iranians and Koreans and I can't recall them using different head gestures, but I suppose it's possible. You've really piqued my interest though.
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I thought it was that very complex society called ' women '.!!
I think in Greece they do the reverse movements for "yes" and" no" (they nod for "no").

As to the "up to here", I can only speak the of Belgian and French habit: we start the gesture at about eybrow/forehead level, a little like a salute, but the other way round.
Alan.esI thought it was that very complex society called ' women '.!!
Hahaha.
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