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Hello,

I came across this in one episode of The Big Bang Theory series:

(Sheldon talking about his decision to have a child with Amy, who he only met recently)

Penny (suggesting Sheldon should date Amy first): Think of it as, uh... getting to know the future mother of your child.
Sheldon: I hadn't considered that.

I assume that Sheldon is using the past perfect in this sense: I hadn't considered that BEFORE you told me.

However, would a native speaker use the past perfect like Sheldon or avoid it? I mean, would I haven't considered that be possible? My reason for this is that Penny's situation-changing statement is extremely recent past (a second or two ago).
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PastsimpleI assume that Sheldon is using the past perfect in this sense: I hadn't considered that BEFORE you told me.
Yes. Native speakers use the past perfect with certain verbs in situations where they admit that a certain idea had not occurred to them earlier, that it is a new idea to them.

-- [Someone presents a new idea or new information.]

-- I hadn't [considered / thought of / heard / realized / seen / noticed] that.

(before you pointed it out to me)

CJ
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Hi,

'I hadn't considered that' is not an unusual thing to say in such a context..

It makes it sound like you are starting to consider it.

Clive
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If I got it right:

I hadn't considered that (before you told me). = I'm perhaps starting to consider it.

I didn't consider that. = I didn't consider it back then when I was thinking about having a child with her. I'm not saying I'll start to consider it.

I haven't considered that. = I haven't considered it (ever since the time I got the idea to have a child with her). I'm not saying I'll start to consider it.

Right? Emotion: smile
Hi,

Yeah, that's the right general idea.

Clive
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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.