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John: Do you have any comment?

Mary: Yes, I have a comment. Could you write your words bigger on the blackboard?

Hi,

Does the line in bold in the above sound right? If not, how should I reword it? Thanks.
Comments  
Hi Angliholic

If Mary wanted to be nit-picky, she would say that she had a request (not a comment). I'd also say that the words "on the blackboard" would prbably be omitted because "on the blackboard" would probably be clear from the context, and the context would also make "your words" totally unnecessary:

John: Do you have any comment?

Mary: Yes(, I do.) Could you write bigger (on the blackboard), please?
YankeeHi Angliholic

If Mary wanted to be nit-picky, she would say that she had a request (not a comment). I'd also say that the words "on the blackboard" would prbably be omitted because "on the blackboard" would probably be clear from the context, and the context would also make "your words" totally unnecessary:

John: Do you have any comment?

Mary: Yes(, I do.) Could you write bigger (on the blackboard), please?

Thanks, Amy.

To make sure, does the following sound right?

Mary: Yes, I have a comment. You have a very special way of explaining the subtle question.

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Hi Angliholic,

The bold section sounds right and natural. If you wanted to move it up a register, you could say, "Could you please write your words larger on the blackboard?" Or if it were a real situation, "Could you please write larger?"

Just a word about John's line: While "Do you have any comment?" is not uncommon, we would be more likely to say, "Do you have any comments?" Or, as Mary did, "Do you have a comment?" (Only a slight difference here.)

Edit. I just read Amy's post. Good point. I had taken the incongruity as an attempt at humor, which probably wouldn't have been appropriate in a really formal situation.
More likely:
You have a very special way of explaining subtle questions.
AvangiHi Angliholic,

The bold section sounds right and natural. If you wanted to move it up a register, you could say, "Could you please write your words larger on the blackboard?" Or if it were a real situation, "Could you please write larger?"

Just a word about John's line: While "Do you have any comment?" is not uncommon, we would be more likely to say, "Do you have any comments?" Or, as Mary did, "Do you have a comment?" (Only a slight difference here.)

Edit. I just read Amy's post. Good point. I had taken the incongruity as an attempt at humor, which probably wouldn't have been appropriate in a really formal situation.

Thanks, Avangi and Amy.

Got it.
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One more and I'll butt out: Don't I see this as a title, or as an introduction? "This is Amy's approach to the subtle question:" I.e., not a specific question but the subject of subtle questions.