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Suppose, he has a car and she has a car (don't mind who they are). They have a car or two cars? And is the term suppose to be their car or their cars? Emotion: smile I always use plural when it's about different objects that are connected to the subjects but sometimes I get confused because I read something like this:

Ally and Joe bought a same Volkswagen model but they chose different colour(s) for their car.

I thought its suppose to be their cars because they don't share a same car but they bought two different cars. Can someone tell me the truth? Emotion: smile
Comments  
HMFindlay
Suppose, he has a car and she has a car (don't mind who they are). They have a car or two cars? Tom and Suzy have a car: I understand they share the same car. Tom and Suzy both have a car: 2 cars. They each have a car: 2 cars.

And is the term suppose to be their car or their cars? Emotion: smile I always use plural when it's about different objects that are connected to the subjects but sometimes I get confused because I read something like this:

Ally and Joe bought the same Volkswagen model but they chose different colours. full stop. We understand each car has a different colour. Or "for their respective cars".

I thought its suppose to be their cars because they don't share a same car but they bought two different cars. Can someone tell me the truth? Emotion: smile

I don't know if it's the truth, but it sounds logical ...
Two people may own a car jointly. But in your example, each owns a car. Therefore, you are correct in using their cars.

Mom and Dad own a single car. You'd say, "Their car is in the driveway."

If Mom and Dad each owned a car, you'd say, Their cars are in the driveway.

Ikia
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HMFindlay
Ally and Joe bought a same Volkswagen model but they chose different colour(s) for their car.

I thought its suppose to be their cars because they don't share a same car but they bought two different cars. Can someone tell me the truth? Emotion: smile

It's fine. A word has been omitted, and it is probably the word "respective":

Ally and Joe bought the same Volkswagen model, but (each) chose a different colour for their (respective) car.

If you go for the formal, some would say "older", approach:

Ally and Joe bought the same Volkswagen model, but each chose a different colour for his car.
So... both their car and their cars are correct?!
HMFindlaySo... both their car and their cars are correct?!
Only if your readers realise that "respective" has been omitted.
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I'm not sure on how to make them realise but anyway, are they both correct or no? Emotion: stick out tongue