A. I hope that answers your question.

B. I hope that answered your question.

C. I hope you that has answered your question.

D. I hope I answer your question.

E. I hope I answered your question.

F. I hope I have answered your question.

G. I'm glad I helped.

H. I'm glad I have helped.

I. I'm glad I was able to help.

1. Which sentences are correct in each set above suppose I were to say them after giving an answer or explanation to someone?

2. Is there any difference in meaning between the correct answers in number 1?

3. Of the correct answers, which do native speakers commonly speak of given the scenario in number 1?
These are OK

A. I hope that answers your question.

B. I hope that answered your question.

C. I hope you that has answered your question.

D. I hope I answer your question.-- A hope for the future

E. I hope I answered your question.

F. I hope I have answered your question.

G. I'm glad I helped.

H. I'm glad I have helped.

I. I'm glad I was able to help.

1. Which sentences are correct in each set above suppose I were to say them after giving an answer or explanation to someone?-- Only D is not so.

2. Is there any difference in meaning between the correct answers in number 1?-- No, no difference in intent (except D).

3. Of the correct answers, which do native speakers commonly speak of given the scenario in number 1?-- All are common.
I hope i have clarified your concern,
This would be much more polite way.Emotion: smile
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AnonymousI hope i have clarified your concern,This would be much more polite way.
No, it wouldn't. All of the original sentences are polite enough. Your version is no more polite, and it is less natural.
AnonymousI hope I have clarified your concern. This would be much more polite way.
The problem is that if you clarify someone's concern, you just make it more clear what they are concerned (or worried) about. That has nothing to do with answering their question.

CJ