+0

http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/LikelyChance/bcnjlx/post.htm

Do you normally tell sick people, "I hope you get well soon," not "I hope you'll get well soon"?
1 2
Comments  
Yes.
Yes.

Rover
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I hope you get well soon.

It is more than casual practice: native speakers normally use simple present for future actions in certain subordinate clauses.

I'll see him when I go to Tokyo tomorrow.
I hope it snows this winter.
If she comes today, please show her right in.
After the meeting finishes, maybe we can go for a beer.
Thank you, all.



Does "Do you think he's in school tomorrow" sound better?
HUBLOTDoes "Do you think he's in school tomorrow" sound better?
No, this doesn’t work at all.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thank you, AG.



Seems like "hope" is an exception, doesn't it?
HUBLOTSeems like "hope" is an exception, doesn't isn't it?
No, it's not:

I'm asking Nancy to pick up the kids from school tomorrow, I hope she'll do it.

On the other hand:

I'm sure Adam knows how to driver a car, I've seen him doing it before.
I wonder what John is up to, he's been acting very suspeciously lately.
I guess Debbie failed the exam because she wasn't prepared.
screamererI'm sure Adam knows how to driver a car, I've seen him doing it before.I wonder what John is up to, he's been acting very suspeciously lately.I guess Debbie failed the exam because she wasn't prepared.
What have these to do with the question?
screamererHUBLOTSeems like "hope" is an exception, doesn't isn't it?No, it's not:
(It) Seems like "hope" is an exception, doesn't it? is correct, screamerer.

Hope is indeed different from the other verbs in that list in that it can be followed by a present-tense verb. The others can't. In your example, "I hope she does it" is possible.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more