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T-Bag: What are you doing in my cell?

Michael: I want in.

(Q1: What does “I want in” mean here? Does Michael actually say “I want in your cell”, or “I want in a fight with you” ? I am not sure about it… )

T-Bag: I'm not quite sure I heard that, Fish. Did you just say you're in?

Michael: That's right.

T-Bag: You know the old saying, don't you? In for an inch, in for a mile.

(Q2: Is “In for an inch, in for a mile” an old saying in English? But I could not find it in any dictionary and throughout the Internet!! Then what is the meaning of this old saying?)

Michael: Whatever it takes. You want me to fight, I'll fight. The bolt from the bleachers, that's what it was for.

T-Bag: Well, you want to fight, you gonna get your chance. Next count.

Michael: Tonight?
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nideaMichael: I want in.
This is an expression related to "the in-crowd." It means there is a clique, an exclusive group of people that has social power, esteem, respect, money, the latest fashions, expensive things, etc. Someone who wants to be "in." wants to be part of this group.

nideaIn for an inch, in for a mile
The old saying he might be quoting is "give a man an inch, and he will take a mile" or "give an inch, and they'll take a mile"
It means if you give someone a small concession, then they will take advantage of you. For example, you ask for a dollar and I say OK, and instead of taking one dollar, you take all the money in my wallet.
But that is not the actual meaning of the quote; the old saying has been distorted to a different connotation. He means that that you are either in all the way or not at all.
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nideaWhat does “I want in” mean here?
I want to be included in the project you have in mind.
nideaThen what is the meaning of this old saying?
In this context, I'd say it means that you can't participate only partially. If something good happens, you get the benefit, but if something bad happens, you have to take the consequences. You can't change your mind and back out if things don't go well.

It's a modification of "In for a penny, in for a pound", which you can research on the internet.

CJ
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Comments  
nidea
What season?
Which episode?
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
AlpheccaStarsThis is an expression related to "the in-crowd." It means there is a clique, an exclusive group of people that has social power, esteem, respect, money, the latest fashions, expensive things, etc. Someone who wants to be "in." wants to be part of this group.

Hi! AlpheccaStars and CaliJim,

Thank you very much for your help. I get it now!

You both had a good one!! Thank you!!
Saltukhannidea
What season?
Which episode?


Hello! Saltukhan,

Well, it is the Season 01, Episode 02. Kekeke ....