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Hi,

Here's a line from the first episode of the 1951 sitcom I love Lucy:
- Now this is my plan. We'll go in there and I'll say, "I know what let's do Monday night. Let's go to a night club!"

The intended meaning of the phrase in bold is clear, but I've never encoutered it in that form. Could you please give me some information about it?
Would you say it's old-fashioned, a regionalism, a speaker's quirk, fine but rare?

Thank you for your help
H.
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It just seems to be badly punctuated.

I know what, let's do Monday night.
I know what – let's do Monday night.

"I know what ..." is set phrase used as a preface to a suggestion or presentation of an idea.
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You mean "let's do Monday" as opposed to any other day of the week?
The thought crossed my mind. I rejected it because it had already been made clrear in the scene that it was going to be Monday night; it seems odd to announce it as a a new thing.
But if you say that "I know what let's do" just doesn't exist, then it's probably just an oddity in the storyline. Or I'm missing something.

Thank you
H.
I don't think your original means "I know what. Let's do Monday night." Rather, it means "I know what we should do on Monday night -- here's my suggestion."

To me, "I know what let's do" is an acceptable, understandable, very casual way to say "I know what we should do. Let's do this." I might well say it myself, but I wouldn't want to have to defend its grammar.
Henry74I rejected it because it had already been made clrear in the scene that it was going to be Monday night; it seems odd to announce it as a a new thing.
In that case you're right, my explanation doesn't seem to fit well. It may be that Khoff is correct. Nevertheless, for me, "I know what let's do Monday night" does not seem like a combination of words that is possible in English. Perhaps is it a phrasing that is used in the US but not the UK.
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Did Desi say this?
My recollection is that his character was one who did not speak correct English.
It is indeed Desi. So you're saying her loose grammar is meant to be part of the character. That makes sense.
Thanks.

H.
Henry74It is indeed Desi. So you're saying her loose grammar is meant to be part of the character. That makes sense.Thanks.H.
I think it sounds more like Ethel, and the situation seems more like Lucy/Ethel than Lucy/Desi. And it maintains the idea of loose grammar of the character.
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khoffTo me, "I know what let's do" is an acceptable, understandable, very casual way to say "I know what we should do. Let's do this." I might well say it myself, but I wouldn't want to have to defend its grammar.
Ditto!
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