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Is the following sentence correct? If it is then what does that mean?

I was looking forward to meet you.
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TO ME

correct.this means "i expect to know you, to see you or something like that"

do not make sure until a teacher approve that
Jackson6612Is the following sentence correct? No If it is then what does that mean?

I was looking forward to meet you.
No, Jackson (and Saltukhan), that sentence is always grammatically wrong.
You must use either a noun or the -ing form of a verb after "look forward to":

I was looking forward to meeting you.

It means that you were anticipating with pleasure being introduced to someone (in the past).

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Thank you. I ALWAYS get this wrong.
AnonymousThank you. I ALWAYS get this wrong.
And now you can look forward to getting it right. Emotion: wink
Yankee
Jackson6612Is the following sentence correct? No If it is then what does that mean?

I was looking forward to meet you.

No, Jackson (and Saltukhan), that sentence is always grammatically wrong.
You must use either a noun or the -ing form of a verb after "look forward to":

I was looking forward to meeting you.

It means that you were anticipating with pleasure being introduced to someone (in the past).

But meet is also a noun. Then why do we have to gerund meeting instead of meet?
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Hi,

But meet is also a noun. Can you write a simple sentence where you use it as a noun?

Best wishes, Clive
The following quote is from this post .


Yankee wrote:

As regards using the -ing form of a verb after the word 'to', I've found that it is often easier to simply learn the expressions in which it is required. In other words, learn expressions such as 'look forward to doing' as a single unit and then practice using them as often as you can until the 'doing' part feels natural and automatic in those expressions. The word 'to' is followed by the base form of a verb (i.e. the word 'to' indicates an infinitive) much more often than it is followed by the '-ing form'.

Unfortunately, 'used to do' and 'be used to doing' are always confusing to learn. However, to understand why the 'ing form' is necessary in 'be used to doing', keep in mind that the 'doing' part can be replaced by a noun. That is the point of the "preposition explanation" in this case -- every grammar book will tell you that prepositions are always followed by nouns.

- We are used to our new house now. (We are used to living here now.)
- He is used to the rules of the game. (He is used to playing by the rules.)
- I wasn't used to the high speeds on German highways when I first moved to Germany. (I wasn't used to driving at the usual German speeds when I first moved to Germany.)

What noun could replace meeting in the following sentence:

I was looking forward to meeting you?

It's the entire phrase meeting you that can be replaced by a noun, not just meeting:

I was looking forward to the concert.
I was looking forward to my vacation.
I was looking forward to the end of the day.


CJ
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