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Hi,
I really don't know what the meaning of these is:

I love me some apple pie.
I like me some apple pie.
I want me some apple pie.
...and so on.

It seems you can't leave out "some", it's part of those structures. They are part of informal English, I believe, but I really don't know when they are used and what their exact meanings are.

Thank you. Emotion: smile
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Kooyeen, I'd say it's very informal speech for "I would really like to have a piece of apple pie." It's entirely non-standard, in my opinion.
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Grammar GeekKooyeen, I'd say it's very informal speech for "I would really like to have a piece of apple pie." It's entirely non-standard, in my opinion.
Raredly do I, but here I would say substandard.
I'm gonna get me summa them new mud guards for my pick-up.
I found me a good place to skin squirrel and rattler.
I bought me a gator trap last week, and I already got me two gators.


Substitution of me for myself (you for yourself, etc. much less often, if at all) (shown above) is not standard, but your examples don't even fit into that category. Very puzzling.

I love me some apple pie.
I love myself some apple pie???

CJ
Hi,

If memory serves, the old song said that Davey Crockett 'kilt hisself a b'ar when he wuz only three'(He killed a bear when he was only three).Emotion: big smile

Best wishes, Clive
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Thank you for your replies.

Interesting... you guys don't seem to use that structure, I guess it could be something regional (probably southern), or it could be part of the expressions younger people use. I just asked a person I know (from Virginia), and they said "I love me some apple pie" just means "I love apple pie". Interesting, uh?
If you search the net, you'll find an avalanche of examples, it seems it's more common than I thought...
I love me some Sharon Jones.
I love me some him. (a song)
I love me some bad movies.
I love me some Shakespeare.

That's non-standard, anyway.
Emotion: smile