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First of all I would like to thank Milky, CJ, Paco, Philip, Rishonly and Goodman (others?) for their comments to my posts. I’m very grateful for this.

Now please, consider this:

I suppose we all would agree that all human beings are able to make mistakes, so we all make mistakes. As in the American movie (1959) “Some Like it Hot” by Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon, etc., “Nobody is perfect” (last speech of the film). Following this thoughts, a sentence like “I can be wrong” seems not to have real sense. For this reason (I believe) I much more often hear “I may be wrong”, which would mean with some uncertainty that perhaps I’m wrong. But yesterday, I heard “I can be wrong”, told by a person that looked well-spoken – That was said not with the meaning of “of course I’m a human being and I’m able to be wrong”. So,

1.- Is it correct to say “I can be wrong”? (I’m not talking about grammar, but about common correct use)

2.- Is “I can be wrong” often used in everyday conversation?

3.- Is “I could be wrong” a common appropriate phrase? If yes, when I should use “I may be wrong” and “I could be wrong”.

4.- Is in this context “I may be wrong” the same as “I might be wrong” (I suppose almost nobody uses might)

Eladio (Maybe acting as a perfectionist English learner, but Nobody is Perfect) And thank you in advance!
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I imagine that they are all used (I can/could/may/might be wrong), to mean the same thing. Individuals may have their own preferences as to which they habitually use. In my experience, can is the least common form.

Did you ask Ms Google?

I could be wrong -- 3.1 million hits
I might be wrong -- 887,000
I may be wrong -- 1.85 million
I can be wrong -- 63,700
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Hi Eladio,

1.- Is it correct to say “I can be wrong”? (I’m not talking about grammar, but about common correct use) No, it's not common.

2.- Is “I can be wrong” often used in everyday conversation? No

3.- Is “I could be wrong” a common appropriate phrase? Yes, very common.

If yes, when I should use “I may be wrong” and “I could be wrong”. 'May' suggests more real doubt on behalf of the speaker. 'Could' suggests less real doubt, more mere politeness. Having said that, both of these expressions can convey these two qualities, and there is not a large difference. Much depends on tone of voice and othe matters of context.

4.- Is in this context “I may be wrong” the same as “I might be wrong” (I suppose almost nobody uses might) True

Best wishes, Clive