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Hello, I'm a foreigner studying english and I have some question about the use of preposition.

I saw the name of one book (if memory serve me right, it's cambridge press's book) and I don't understand its structure so I need some advice.

The name is "In at the deep". It's very short, isn't it ?
But its length doesn't make it easier for me to understand.

I know the grammatical rules that in one ID (independent clause), there can be only 1 Subject, Object, Verb, and Preposition; if we want to put more than one of these words, we can do so by using conjunctions. But this rule doesn't apply to adverb and adjective since we can have as many as we like.

These are my understanding.

Looking at the title of that book, I don't understand its structure since it should be incorrect because there are more than one prep in that phrase (we can't count it as a sentence since it lacks of verb).
But I don't think that title is incorrect since it's the name of the cambridge's book.
Maybe my knowledge is so short that I can't understand it.

Could anyone please explain its structure to me and tell be how its having more than one prep in the sentence is valid ?

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This area is less important so you can disregard it.
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P.s. I did some research and came up with something.
I did search "in at the end" in google and I found many websites have this kind of stuff like "In at the top".

And I saw one article in BBC's website which is named "In at the deep end".
Here is the link to the article:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/1518554.stm

Well, after reading that article, I found that the phrase "In at the deep end" was actually taken from a full sentense stating that "I think there is a lot to be said for jumping in at the deep end".

In this case, I perfectly understand its structure since "jumping in" is a phrasal verb (jump in) which, even if it consists of a verb and a prep, isn't counted as a prep, so prep can follow phrasal verb without a problem.

From this finding, I think that if that phrase (in at the deep) is taken from the full sentence like "-- something phrasal verb-- in at the deep", my doubt in this matter is out of question, but I don't know if I get it right. I don't know if there is any way or situation that we can validly use 2 preps in the same ID (without conjunction, of course).

Any input would be appreciated.
Comments  
Hi,

Welcome to this forum. In my opinion, I don’t think you should be too concerned about the title of a book, a song or a movie as they are not bound by grammar rules most of the time.

You said “Could anyone please explain its structure to me and tell be how its having more than one prep in the sentence is valid ?”

It’s not absolutely true. Right off the top of my head I can think of a couple phrases which are commonly used all the time and they are:

“He is [In for a surprise]”and [out to lunch]. So grammar rules are just guidelines and you will find exceptions to the rules all the time. That's my two cents.

I believe 'In at the Deep End' is a record label, but I'm not familiar with a book titled In at the Deep (without End on the end). In any case, in is an adverb and at is a preposition.

I [jumped in / plunged in] at the deep end of the pool. So now I am "in (the water) at the deep (end)". It's possible that the water is omitted so that another possibility is left open, namely, I am now in (trouble) at the deep (end), i.e., in big trouble.
These are the only meanings I can ascribe to In at the Deep. Further context might clarify.

CJ
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Are you sure it wasn't this reference that I found on google:


IN AT THE DEEP END. Difficulties Experienced by. Hong Kong Chinese ESL Learners. at an Independent School in ... Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ...


Although only the first four words are in bold, 'END' is also part of the title.

In at the Deep End:

Difficulties experienced by Hong Kong Chinese ESL Learners at an independent school in Cambridge UK

Cambridge University Press.

This would relate to the saying 'thrown in at the deep end', which means that you have been thrust into a situation you are not prepared for.
"thrust into a situation you are not prepared for" - "in trouble" - Yes. That's the sort of thing I thought it meant. It evokes being "in over one's head". I don't know what else it could be.
Thanks for every replies.

So it means that this phrase is not the complete sentence, right ? (even if I put "end" in the phrase)
Since you said that:
CalifJim
I [jumped in / plunged in] at the deep end of the pool. So now I am "in (the water) at the deep (end)

nona the brit
This would relate to the saying 'thrown in at the deep end', which means that you have been thrust into a situation you are not prepared for.


It seems like "in" is not the complete word, since it's just a portion of a phrasal verb and the verb is omitted; in your examples, the verbs are jump, plunged, be, and thrown.

If formality is my main concern and I want my sentence to be 100% grammatical correct, I shouldn't omit the verb, right ?

From nona the brit's sentence, it should be like this: I was thrown in at the deep end of the problem (or situation). Is this correct ?

Anyway, I took a look at the longman dictionary and it happens to have the definition of jump/throw in at the deep end, and here it is.

jump in at the deep end (ALSO throw sb in at the deep end)
If you jump or are thrown in at the deep end, you start doing something new and difficult without help or preparation.


It seems like that book-title's omitting the verb confuses me but reading your replies, I've learnt something. If all the thing that I post in this reply are correct, I think I start to understand it.

But if anything is not quite right, your correction would be appreciated.
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YEs you've pretty much got it. You wouldn't need to say: I was thrown in at the deep end (of the problem) - it's a pretty well recognised metaphor and you don't usually to complete it by mentioning the problem.

I believe the saying comes from the old-fashioned idea of teaching someone to swim - just throw them in the pool at the deep end. They have to learn very quickly!
OK, I think I've understood it then.

Thank you very much for every replies.