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some questions here:

1. "But I never realize that all this independence was only a step away from the real thing"

im wondering what dose 'only a step away' mean?

2."in a sence,they were financing the whole deal"

what does "in a sence" mean?

3.what dose "pack your lunch" mean?

4.what dose this sentence mean? "She tries to get more on the level of the students."

Thanks !
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Comments  
Hello,

1- Only a step away = very close (to the real thing)

2- In a sense (I’ve never heard of "senCe") = thinking about something in one way, but not in every way. So in your sentence, maybe they were financing the whole deal, this is partly right.

4- She tries to get more on the level of the students: she tries her best to be on the same level as the other students' .

3- For "Pack your lunch", I’d say "take your lunch with you".

I'd rather wait for other explanations.
1. "But I never realize that all this independence was only a step away from the real thing"

im wondering what dose 'only a step away' mean?

a step away - close, very close, so close

2."in a sence,they were financing the whole deal"

what does "in a sence" mean?


in a sense - to certain extend, not completely but still true, somehow

in essence - really, truly, basically, factually

3.what does "pack your lunch" mean?

pack - prepare to take

your - not my, not his, not her, not their, not our, but your

lunch - food prepared to eat during one specific meal time

4.what does this sentence mean? "She tries to get more on the level of the students."

on the level - honest
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My only commenet is on #4 - On the level of the students.

She tries to speak about things the way the students would, so that when she talks to them, it's not as an adult to a child, but as peers.
Grammar GeekMy only commenet is on #4 - On the level of the students.

She tries to speak about things the way the students would, so that when she talks to them, it's not as an adult to a child, but as peers.

Probably to have more honest, open conversation with them, I guess.
Well, not exactly the same meaning. Open, yes, but not honest the way the other meaning of "the level" has.

The expression "on the level" all by itself has the meaning you gave - honest. "Is this guy on the level?" "Yes, you can trust him."

But "on their level" means "in a manner 'they' can understand." This was the version meant in "on the level of the students."

For example, advice to parents on playing with their kids might be "get down on their level," which means play make-believe games and have conversatiosn with their stuffed animals, and so on.
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Aperisic4.what does this sentence mean? "She tries to get more on the level of the students."
on the level - honest
IMO, that would require a with, definitely not of:
She tries to get more on the level with the students.

Interviews - Laying It Down With Level-C's Janean Buch ( Metal ... I recently got on the level with the band's bassist, Janean Buch, to learn more about this talented heavy music act. Rocket: I notice that your guitars are ...

BTW, the title of this interview seems to be a pun on
on the level

My bilingual dictionary gives the same meaning for both on the level with and on the level of but in different contexts.

On the level with to talk about equal plane (buildings, windows...)

On the level of to talk about "social" (or kind of) equality between people. (I think this is close to what GG said above.)

Is this correct? 'Cause now, I feel sceptical after I read the link Marius gave.

Marius, I don't really get what is said in the article. Could you please tell me if the author means she was on the same level as the bassist? So as to say that during the interview, she felt as if she belonged to the band (?)
In that link, I think she says she sat down with the band leader for a honest (on the level) interview.

This interpretation
on the level=honest (given by Aperisic)
is not the one given in most dictionaries
and is a bit slangy

This is a play/pun on the band's name, Level-C.

However, as I mentioned, I don't think this interpretation applies to the original posting, where the teacher simplifies things to get to the level of understanding of the students.
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