+0
Hey there,

Guys, you know what? I've been studying English for so many years, I've read so many grammar books, I've been consulting lots of smaller and bigger issues concerning grammar... and still (sic) there are things that drive me crazy Emotion: sad Take a look at this one:

1. the present simple vs the present continuous... what's the difference between:

a) Do you think what I think?
and
b) Are you thinking what I'm thinking?
and
c) Are you thiniking what I think?
and
d) Do you think what I'm thinking?

2. again, the same issue, but a different example

a) When we're getting familiar with a language, we may say we're picking it up. (why on earth the present continuous twice?)
and
b) When we get familiar with a language, we may say we pick it up.

3. Again, PS vs PC

a) My dad works as a sales representative.
b) My dad is working as a sales representative.

I often see, or read, that people use "work" in the PC, and I dunno why... I've always thought that "work" is something more stable, and more permanent, like "live"

4. phrasal verbs and their use... can I say the following sentences?

a) If we don't work out our problems, they'll hit us with a greater force next time.
b) With such a bad English, I'll never be able to get across.
c) With such a bad English, I'll never get across.

Thanks in advance,
1 2
Comments  
anglista2008what's the difference between:

a) Do you think what I think?
and
b) Are you thinking what I'm thinking?
and
c) Are you thiniking what I think?
and
d) Do you think what I'm thinking?
It's not necessary to go through all of these in detail, since they are all based on two ideas: what someone thinks (the opinion one usually has) and what someone is thinking (the interpretation of a given situation one has).
a) Do you have the same opinion that I have about this (whatever is being discussed)?
b) Are you interpreting the situation before us in the same way that I am interpreting it?
c) (not very useful)
d) (not very useful)
CJ
anglista2008a) When we're getting familiar with a language, we may say we're picking it up. (why on earth the present continuous twice?)
and
b) When we get familiar with a language, we may say we pick it up.
There is no good reason to break the parallelism, so in both cases the same tense is used in both parts of the sentence.
Why would you define an action in a tense different from the tense given in describing the action originally? That would be like saying:
Dining out is when you went to the restaurant.

Such mixtures can create so much incoherence that they are impossible for the reader to follow.
CJ
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
anglista2008a) My dad works as a sales representative.
b) My dad is working as a sales representative.

I often see, or read, that people use "work" in the PC, and I dunno why... I've always thought that "work" is something more stable, and more permanent, like "live"
Work is less permanent than it used to be! Emotion: smile
CJ
anglista20084. phrasal verbs and their use... can I say the following sentences?

a) If we don't work out our problems, they'll hit us with a greater force next time.
b) With such a bad English, I'll never be able to get across.
c) With such a bad English, I'll never get across.
They are all OK. You might want to use this forum to post specific questions about the usage of specific phrasal verbs, and improve your understanding of them that way.
CJ
They are all OK? Are you fully awake today CJ?

You should say "With such bad English, I'll never be able to get my point/meaning/ideas across".
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Anon,
I know it's not my business. If you are new to this forum and plan to be a frequent visitor, I suggest that you conduct your manners in a respectable tone to the volunteers. CJ is one of the top dogs on the panel and I like to agree with him that these sentences you had posted are grammatically correct and can be used depending on how you want to use it. If you have additional questons due to your lack of understanding, you may rephrase your question or repeat them but dispaying your sarcasm to people who try to help you is very unwise and disrespectful. I think an apology is most appropriate.
Actually, I misread them. The a in a bad English should be dropped.
As for adding something like point, meaning, or ideas, that can be done, of course, but it is not entirely necessary. People often leave pieces of their thoughts implicit. I don't think it would be unusual for someone to say that they didn't "get across", meaning that they were not understood as well as they might have wished.
CJ
CalifJim
anglista2008a) When we're getting familiar with a language, we may say we're picking it up. (why on earth the present continuous twice?)
and
b) When we get familiar with a language, we may say we pick it up.
There is no good reason to break the parallelism, so in both cases the same tense is used in both parts of the sentence.
Why would you define an action in a tense different from the tense given in describing the action originally? That would be like saying:
Dining out is when you went to the restaurant.
Such mixtures can create so much incoherence that they are impossible for the reader to follow.
CJ

1. then... is there any difference at all, between saying such a sentence in tPS than in tPC? does it mean exactly the same when I say (again, or 'when I'm saying' ?)

a) when we get familiar...
b) when we're getting familiar...

2.coming back to the 'work' issue... I guess there's not much of a difference between saying "I work for/in/at(?) the AT&T" and "I'm working for/in/at(?) the AT&T" ?

thanks, best wishes!
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more