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Hi

Which of the sentences given below is correct? 'afternoon' can be used as an adjective or noun. I think #2 is correct. "in" is used as a preposition to connect the noun phrase "the afternoon" with the rest of the sentence. Please help me with it. Many thanks.

1: I will be in my room afternoon.

2: I will be in my room in the afternoon.
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Comments  
Afternoon is an adjective in neither sentence. The first sentence is incorrect, but if it were correct, afternoon would be an adverb of time / a temporal adverb. In some rather rare cases a noun can be used adverbially without a preposition: I'll be in my room [on] Friday.

Also note: He studies nights, which usually means: He goes to night school.

CB
As it's written, sentence 1 is incorrect.

However, it would be correct if you were to write "I will be in my room after noon." (noon being twelve o'clock in the day; midday)

Sentence 2 is correct.

Cheers,

John
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Cool Breeze The first sentence is incorrect, but if it were correct, afternoon would be an adverb of time / a temporal adverb.
I have a problem with that label. (Is that what the powers that be have decided?) Emotion: sad

"afternoon" is actually a noun. The phrase "in the afternoon" refers to time.

In some rather rare cases a noun can be used adverbially without a preposition: I'll be in my room [on] Friday.
To me it makes more sense to call "Friday" a noun and say that the preposition has been omitted.

Also note: He studies nights, which usually means: He goes to night school.
But I have to assume that 'He studies sunsets.' means that sunsets is his field of study.

CB
An adverb of time usually gives a reply to the question "when?". Of course "afternoon" and "Friday" are nouns, and as I said, "afternoon" cannot be used adverbially or as an adverb. However, "Friday" can be used as as adverb without the preposition "on":

When did he come?

He came Friday.

If you or anyone else don't want to call it an adverb in the above sentence, I have no objection.Emotion: smile I'll stick to the classification I am used to.

CB
Thanks a lot, CB, John, Canadian.

Cool BreezeAfternoon is an adjective in neither sentence. The first sentence is incorrect, but if it were correct, afternoon would be an adverb of time / a temporal adverb. In some rather rare cases a noun can be used adverbially without a preposition: I'll be in my room [on] Friday.

Also note: He studies nights, which usually means: He goes to night school.

CB
Hi CB

According to M-W Col. Dic. 'Friday' is a noun but 'Fridays' could be used as an adverb. What do you say on this? Please let me know.

canadian45
Cool Breeze The first sentence is incorrect, but if it were correct, afternoon would be an adverb of time / a temporal adverb.
I have a problem with that label. (Is that what the powers that be have decided?)

"afternoon" is actually a noun. The phrase "in the afternoon" refers to time.

In some rather rare cases a noun can be used adverbially without a preposition: I'll be in my room [on] Friday.To me it makes more sense to call "Friday" a noun and say that the preposition has been omitted.

Also note: He studies nights, which usually means: He goes to night school. But I have to assume that 'He studies sunsets.' means that sunsets is his field of study.
CB
Hi Canadian

(Is that what the powers that be have decided?) - Who knows. Perhaps, CB likes this label. But I think I have seen someone else too using this label.

To me it makes more sense to call "Friday" a noun and say that the preposition has been omitted. - I agree with you.

Cool BreezeAn adverb of time usually gives a reply to the question "when?". Of course "afternoon" and "Friday" are nouns, and as I said, "afternoon" cannot be used adverbially or as an adverb. However, "Friday" can be used as as adverb without the preposition "on":

When did he come?
He came Friday.

If you or anyone else don't want to call it an adverb in the above sentence, I have no objection. I'll stick to the classification I am used to.

CB

If someone doesn't want to call it adverb, then she/he is only left with the choice of saying that preposition has been omitted.

Best wishes

Jackson
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Jackson6612According to M-W Col. Dic. 'Friday' is a noun but 'Fridays' could be used as an adverb. What do you say on this? Please let me know.
I will just have to reiterate what I have already said. This is how Random House Dictionary defines an adverb:

"Any member of a class of words that in many languages are distinguished in form, as partly in English by the ending -ly, or by functioning as modifiers of verbs or clauses, and in some languages, as Latin and English, also as modifiers of adjectives or other adverbs or adverbial phrases, as very, well, quickly. Adverbs typically express some relation of place, time, manner, attendant circumstance, degree, cause, inference, result, condition, exception, concession, purpose, or means."

If we accept the above definition for our premise, Friday is an adverb in this sentence: He will come Friday. If Friday isn't an adverb in that sentence, then, by the same logic, early isn't an adverb in this sentence: He will come early. Of course the preposition (on) has been omitted, but Friday is nevertheless an answer to the question: When will he come? An expression such as on Friday is an adverbial consisting of a preposition and a noun. This definition is from the above dictionary:

"adverbial

–n.
2. a word or group of words functioning as an adverb."

Friday is a word in the above sentence functioning as an adverb, so we could call Friday an adverbial, too. On Friday is a group of words functioning as an adverb, so we can call on Friday an adverbial. I learned these things, parts of speech and basic grammatical terms, at age 11 in school, so I find discussing them a little boring. As I have already said, I know that not all people analyze language the same way. There are many classifications for all manner of things. I have put forth the grammatical analysis I adhere to. If anyone wants to think differently, I am the last person to object.

CB
Thanks a lot, CB.

I'm more comfortable with calling "Friday" an adverbial.

If we accept the above definition for our premise, Friday is an adverb in this sentence: He will come Friday. If Friday isn't an adverb in that sentence, then, by the same logic, early isn't an adverb in this sentence: He will come early.
Would you please tell me in what sense you used the word "premise "? Thank you.
Jackson6612Would you please tell me in what sense you used the word "premise"? Thank you.
This is the meaning I had in mind:

"premise

1. Also, premiss. Logic. a proposition supporting or helping to support a conclusion."

(RHUD)

CB
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