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I want to know below:

A: I see the tiger which is running to the cow

How does a native speaker images that I see the tiger which-
How does a native speaker images that I see the tiger which is running to the cow.

There is no relative pronoun in korean grammar.
Comments  
I see the tiger that is running toward the cow.
I see the tiger which is running toward the cow.
I see the tiger running toward the cow.

These are good; and if you are fond of tigers, you could probably use:

I see the tiger who is running toward the cow.

Does this answer your question, Uamrich?
thank for your answer.
But that's not the answer which i wnat to get.

I want to know :

how a native speaker images relative pronoun?

for example:

A: i see the tiger
B: I see the tiger that-
C: I see the tiger that is running toward the cow

How do you draw "b" into your mind.
How do you draw 'c" into your mind.

I am eager to know it.

thank you in advance.
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The pronoun creates no image itself-- it is a grammatical device to refer back to the tiger. As you said, your language has none, so there must be no contingent image: whether it is said in English or Korean, it is the same tiger doing the same thing to the same cow.

A: I see a big, yellow-and-black cat.
B: I see a big, yellow-and-black cat.
C: I see a big, yellow-and-black cat chasing a big, frightened black-and-white cow.
thank you and thank your answer.

however, how do you image sentences below,

A: I see [ that the tiger is running toward the cow.]
B: I see [the tiger that is running toward the cow.]
C: I see [ the tiger, which is running toward the cow.]

of course, I know the difference of that sentences among them.
But, the final image of the sentences is same.

final image: A(tiger) is running toward B(the cow)

if the final image is the same, do you recognize the differenc among them only by a grammmatical device[=conjection, defintive relative pronoun, indefintive relative pronoun]

please answer me again.

thank in advance
In B, I see more than one tiger. A & C are the same image (in spite of the comma, these two sentences are the same-- the comma is an artificial adjunct).

I think you should wait for another opinion about 'images', though, Uamrich.
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Interesting questions.

I imagine a tiger running toward a cow and like, Mister Micawber, I imagine more than one tiger in B (but the others are not running towards the cow).

I also imagine a human witness (other than myself) to all this, because of the use of 'I see'.

The tiger is running towards a cow - this is being 'seen' by a human rather than just happening in the middle of nowhere. I am not the witness though as I would not bother thinking or writing 'I see' as to me, that is clearly the only way for me experience this (unless I had exceptional hearing perhaps). I am imagining the thoughts or statement of another person 'I see a tiger....'
To add my 2p-worth, uamrich:

For me, in your first 3 sentences, 'that' and 'which' are imageless.

In your second 3 sentences, the 'I see that' structure gives me a strong sense of another person; 'that' and 'which' affect the tone of voice of that person.

A, for instance, is a considered, perhaps rather humorously dry statement.

B seems to require a second sentence: 'but I don't see that other tiger you were talking about (the one you said was running towards the farmer)'.

C also seems to require a second sentence: 'I see the tiger, which is running towards the cow; but I don't see a lion anywhere. Are you sure you saw one?'

MrP
thank you, everybody. God bless you!
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