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This morning I came across a conversation of 2 boys on street:

A: "My little brother went to my mom. he's like mom can you give 5 dallors?" "My mom's like honey I gave you $10 last weekend."

B: "How did he do?"

A: "He's like very sad"

What do "I am like, She's like, He's like, You're like" mean?
Sometimes it seems that "He's like" means "He said" (he's like mom can you give 5 dallors? = he said mom can you give 5 dallors?)
But sometimes it seems that "He's like" means "He is" (He's like very sad = he is very sad).
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>he's like mom can you give 5 dallors?

He said, "Mom, can you give me 5 dollars?"

>"He's like very sad"
He is kind of very sad.

Non-standard, popular with the youth.
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Also in the UK
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BTW, I guess it's a slang.
I am in US.
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WarrenerThis morning I came across a conversation of 2 boys on street:

A: "My little brother went to my mom. he's like mom can you give 5 dallors?" "My mom's like honey I gave you $10 last weekend."

B: "How did he do?"

A: "He's like very sad"

What do "I am like, She's like, He's like, You're like" mean?
Sometimes it seems that "He's like" means "He said" (he's like mom can you give 5 dallors? = he said mom can you give 5 dallors?)
But sometimes it seems that "He's like" means "He is" (He's like very sad = he is very sad).

Some would call it an "articulated pause", but I'm not really like sure. It definitely is not sophisticated speech.