+0
I often hear native speakers saying "I am doing laundry this saturday" instead of saying "I will do laundry this saturday.
I have encountered plenty more examples that native speakers actively use present progressive tense even though it seemed to me irrelevant to the circumstance they are situated in.
For an another instance, in the voice class I once took, most students who were to perform singing for midterm exam said "I will be sining "blah blah blah" prior to start. Couldnt they have said "I will sing "blah blah blah". whats the sensational diffrence each approach has? this question might look stupid to you but it really bothers me. Please help me! Thank you!

furthermore, is it ok to respond " I am having two big macs or whatever" if they want me to confirm my order in restaurant?
Comments  
I often hear native speakers saying 'I am doing Laundry this saturday' instead of saying 'I will do laundry this saturday'
I have encountered plenty more examples that native speakers actively use present progressive tense even though it seemed to me irrelevant to the circumstance the speaker is situated in.
For an another instance, in the voice class I once took, most students who were to perform their singing for midterm exam said prior to singing, "I will be singing "Blah blah blah". instead of saying "I will sing "Blah blah blah"." Whats the difference? This question might look stupid to you but I honestly do not sense the different degree of sensation each approach has. Please help me! Thank You!
Hello Mr.
they are absolutely right according to the grammar.
i will tell you how;
these sentences are generally representing the duration of work which they will be engaged in.
moreover in these types of sentences,more emphasize is given to the duration of the work in which person/people will be involved.

and Regarding your second problem related to restaurant, i don't have any idea.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
In English, U can use present continuous for future tense.

When u use present cont., u will try to express that u have planned & u have arranged to do it. For instance:

I am going to school tomorrow. (I have planned to go and I have arranged to do it).
I will go to school tomorrow. ( haven't planned yet).
AnonymousI often hear native speakers saying 'I am doing Laundry this saturday' instead of saying 'I will do laundry this saturday'
I have encountered plenty more examples that native speakers actively use present progressive tense even though it seemed to me irrelevant to the circumstance the speaker is situated in.
The present progressive is often used as a future.
AnonymousFor an another instance, in the voice class I once took, most students who were to perform their singing for midterm exam said prior to singing, "I will be singing "Blah blah blah". instead of saying "I will sing "Blah blah blah"." Whats the difference?
The difference is not, strictly speaking, the meaning, but the circumstances. Some choices of tense are based on the situation in which the speaker finds himself. As it turns out for this particular situation, when a performance is announced, it is often done with the future progressive tense.

I will be performing the Emperor Concerto tomorrow night.
Jane will be singing the role of Mimi in La Boheme this fall.
Our rock band will be playing at the Saddleback Bar tonight.

Sometimes what is done is only like a performance.

Barbara will be signing her new book Audition at the Barnes and Noble bookstore next Saturday afternoon.


CJ
First of all, I really thank you for being a good teacher to me. Is there any regularities in distingushing those circumstances in which I can use (present/future) progressive instead of present or future verbs? Thank you!
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hello,
The present continous is used to express the future when you have already planned everything and you will certainly carry them out,whereas the future simple is used to express the future in general (without planning)
eg:I am playing a match this afternoon (arrangement made) vs I will play a match