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Hello, I've found sentences like these:
1. I don't want them bringing their children to see me.
2. She lost track of him, found him somehow, and then she didn't want me making any more enquires.
3. I don't want you all coming here for food.
4. I don't want everybody knowing you've got a broomstick.
5. I don't want you coming home so late.

All the examples show the pattern 'not want someone doing something...'
I've been trying to figure out what if 'to do something' is used instead of 'doing something.'

As far as I know, '(don't) want someone to do something' is most preferred
but it would seem that 'don't want someone doing something' is gaining its own ground.
I've been looking for a plausible explanation, but I haven't.

The question is, what's the difference between the two options?
Is there any difference in nuance?
Comments  
"don't want someone doing something" feels somewhat informal to me. Also, it may emphasise repeated action (or, in fact, absence of repeated action) as opposed to a single instance -- although this distinction is not at all clear-cut (and also doesn't apply to stative verbs like "know").
Thank you very much.
Could you tell me some more about Number 4?
That puzzles me a lot so I wanted to know more about it.
If there is no difference in meaning at all,
is it simply a matter of formality or informality?
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My earlier reply applied to the pattern generally, including #5. I don't see anything especially different about that one. Why does it puzzle you more than the others?
Sorry, I should have typed Number 4, not Number 5.
4. I don't want everybody knowing you've got a broomstick.
Kyung Soo ShinSorry, I should have typed Number 4, not Number 5.4. I don't want everybody knowing you've got a broomstick.
What difference do you see between this one and the others?
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You said your distinction doesn't apply to stative verbs like "know",
and Number 4 contains "know."
so I thought there might be another distinction for stative verbs.

And you said "don't want someone doing something" feels somewhat informal to you,
so I wanted to know it was simply a matter of formality or informality.
OK, I see what you mean; I think I lost track of the question after the the number changed.

I don't want everybody knowing you've got a broomstick.
I don't want everybody to know you've got a broomstick.

I find it hard to see any difference here except that the first one seems a bit more informal.
GPY except that the first one seems a bit more informal.
Now I think I can use it at lest in informal conversations.
(Of course it doesn't suit tests. Emotion: smile)
Thank you very much.
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