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1. I am staying here for six months.

2. I have been staying here for six months.

3. I have stayed here for six months.

What's the difference in meaning between the above three sentences?
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1. I am staying here for six months.
I am already 'here'. My plan is to be here for a total of six months. The end of my stay is still in the future. (There is also a possibility that you are not 'here' yet.)
2. I have been staying here for six months.
I think the usage for this sentence would be extremely limited. I would probably understand it this way:
In the past six months, I have visited 'here' several times. Six months ago I stayed in this hotel for the fist time, and I have stayed in the same hotel (this hotel) on each of my subsequent visits.

3. I have stayed here for six months.
In the past 6 months, I have not moved from 'here'. / I have not changed my position or location in the past 6 months.
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4. I am teaching English for six months.

5. I have been teaching English for six months.

6. I have taught English for six months.

What's the difference in meaning between the above three sentences?
What do you think, Teo?
2. I have been staying here for six months.

I think the usage for this sentence would be extremely limited. I would probably understand it this way:
In the past six months, I have visited 'here' several times. Six months ago I stayed in this hotel for the fist time, and I have stayed in the same hotel (this hotel) on each of my subsequent visits.

3. I have stayed here for six months

In the past 6 months, I have not moved from 'here'. / I have not changed my position or location in the past 6 months.

Interesting. Don't you think 2 might have a similar meaning to 3? Why can't 'staying' be a discontinued state?

I have been working in this company for six months.

I have been staying here for six months.

I have been living here for six months.
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7. It's snowing again.

8. It's been snowing again.

9. It's snowed again.

What's the difference in meaning between the above three sentences?
4. I am teaching English for six months. Incorrect usage.
5. I have been teaching English for six months. I started doing it six months ago and am still doing it. Best sentence of the three.
6. I have taught English for six months. Possibly means the same as no. 5, or could mean that once in the past I taught English for a period of six months.
http://forums.eslcafe.com/student/viewtopic.php?p=105719
1. I am staying here for six months.

2 I am teaching English for six months.

Why is #1 correct usage, but #2 incorrect usage? They seem to have the same structure.
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Imagine a mother was yelling at her daughter who had just told her that she'd be away on vacation. In her hand is a picture of a beautiful resort in Bali, Indonesia, "Nancy, you're not going anywhere!" She shouted back, "I'm staying here for six months. See you next year!"

I think #2 is possible too. I believe you can use the present continuous tense when you insist on doing something just as with scheduled events - I'm flying to LA this weekend, I'm throwing a party at my new neighbor's house tonight at 9.

Another example is

I'm playing soccer and you can't stop me!
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