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As I left the house, I suddenly thought to myself how globalized my life had become.

As I left the house, I suddenly thought of how globalized my life had become.

As I left the house, it camt to/crossed my mind that how globalized my life had become.

The last two versions are how I try to reword the first one, but I'm not sure if they are about the same meanings. Your comments, thanks.
Comments  
The third one is a rather more casual and offhand thinking than the first two. 'Came to my mind' is not so natural as 'came to me' (which is not offhand at all, but instead intense) or 'came to mind'.
Mister MicawberThe third one is a rather more casual and offhand thinking than the first two. 'Came to my mind' is not so natural as 'came to me' (which is not offhand at all, but instead intense) or 'came to mind'.

Thanks, Mister, for the helpful reply.

By the way, could I omit to myself in the first sentence without losing any meaning? That is,

As I left the house, I suddenly thought (to myself) how globalized my life had become.
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Yes, that's a fine idea.
Mister MicawberYes, that's a fine idea.

Thanks, Mister, for the confirmation.

But I forgot to ask whether it will make a change in meaning if I delete to myself.

As I left the house, I suddenly thought (to myself) how globalized my life had become.
How could it change the meaning? It is impossible to think to anyone else but ourselves.
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Got it, Mister, and thanks.
That's why Louis Armstrong sings:
«And I think to myself
What a wonderful world!»

Would be still sound so great and convey so warm emotions if "to myself" was removed?

EDIT:
«As I left the house, it camt to/crossed my mind that how globalized my life had become.»

Isn't "that" redundant here?
«As I left the house, it came to/crossed my mind that how globalized my life had become.»
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