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Please help me to clarify this:
Change this sentence into negative (in 3 ways).
"I used to fly a kite when I was a little kid."

My answers are:
1. I didn't use to fly a kite when I was a little kid.
2. I never used to fly a kite when I was a little kid.
3. I used not to fly a kite when I was a little kid.

And the answers I got from the questioner are these:
1. I used not to fly a kite when I was a little kid.
2. I used to not fly a kite when I was a little kid.
3. I didn't use to fly a kite when I was a little kid.

I told him that number 2 is incorrect. You can't split the infinitive 'to fly' in 'I used to fly' with 'not', but he insisted that it is correct and acceptable in spoken English. He also said that I should see the article about 'used to' in Swan's Practicle English Usage page 604. The problem is I don't have that book, so I can't argue about this issue with him. I have provided him with different references, though.

Please, please, pretty please help me with this.
Calling for Mister Micawber and Paul Tranter . . .
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Comments  (Page 2) 
My apologies for neglecting to log in. That was moi (Paul Tranter).
It is just my observation, and you said you are a teacher which I respect. But I am curous because isn't it true that when we want to express a past idea or something we didn't use to like at childhood, we usually say " I didn't use to like broccoli but I got used to it now". That would be what I am used to.
In your example, I feel that " I used to fly kites (with my father) when I was a kid " is more common, not with an indefinite article 'a'. To me it is more natural to use plural noun in a general statement. For instance: I didn't use to like a bananas but I grew to like it.

Having said that, I feel this sentence has semantic issues- "I used to not fly a kite when I was a little kid"?
Doesn't it convey a sense that you never even tried flying kites. If that is the meaning, then will it be more sensible to say " I never flew a kite as a child"?
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I have a horrible feeling that this is going to be one of those threads that drags on for years, with people dropping in every so often to claim that their preferred form is the most common. In a probably vain attempt to stop this happening I'll say that ALL the following forms are considered natural and correct by at least some educated native speakers:

I used not to fly a kite.
I used to not fly a kite.
I didn't use to fly a kite.
I never used to fly a kite.
I used never to fly a kite.
I usedn't to fly a kite.

"I didn't used to fly a kite" is technically incorrect, but one sees it in print often enough to believe that it is acceptable these days.
fivejedjon"I didn't used to fly a kite" is technically incorrect,
Both "didn't use to" and "didn't used to" look horrible to me in writing.
Thank you so much, Paul, for replying my question. Unfortunately, I don't use Yahoo Mail anymore since I forgot my password. Emotion: big smile Could you please send it to my other email address? I just gave it to you on your personal page.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Anonymous,
This question was posted on my English group on Facebook. I didn't revise his words though I found some semantic issues in his sentence. I don't want to make a big deal out of it since we have many beginner students in the group.
Fivejedjon,
Thank you so much for your explanation.
AlpheccaStars,
Thank you so much for helping me out.
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I'm an English teacher in Korea and I just googled "used not to" because a student asked me whether to use "used not to" or "didn't use to." I said, of course, "didn't used to," "used not to" sounds strange to me.


I found this thread and one thing I don't like in this example is that the person is giving two time frames..."Didn't use to" and "When I was a kid." Personally I don't like this. I would say, "When I was a kid I didn't fly a kite," or "I didn't use to fly a kite."


I don't know where you teach English, but I have often experienced very strange sentences that, though they might be grammatically correct, I have never heard used. I know people are focusing on the grammar here, but I would say the sentence is awkward because the two references to time "used to" and "when I was a kid."

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