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What’s the difference between these two sentences? I read both in a dictionary and I’m confused.

She wasn’t used to him away but she soon got used to it. Now she is used to seeing him once in a year.
She didn’t use to him away but she soon got used to it. Now she is used to seeing him once in a year.

The point is that I believe to understand that “She used to” is a past tense, so “She didn’t use to…” is the negative form of this past tense. Now, “She’s used to” is a present tense, so the negative form of this present tense is “She isn’t used to…”. Now, “She wasn’t used to…” sounds to me like a negative (another?) form of the past tense. Is that correct? In above sentences the use of past forms “wasn’t” and “didn’t” tends to confuse, I believe, to a not English speaker, and to think that both are different forms of the past.
Did you use to play tennis when you were younger? (Past, right?)
Are you used to play tennis? (Present, right?)
I don’t know if I’m being clear in explaining my confusion.

Dear Mister Micawber and MrPedantic thank you for your help with my post “Please, help!!”. Mister Micawber, your advice related to the title of that post (“Please, help!!) is important to me. The fact is that I’m a native Spanish speaker and I’m certainly learning the real spoken English in streets and with all of you in EnglishForward; I mean, in Spanish “Please, help!!” doesn’t implies necessarily a panic situation. We’re used to use many exclamation marks. So, I’m sorry. And I would like to thank CalifJim and Clive for their help with my recent post “Needless / unnecessary”.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
De nada, Eladio.

Did you use to go to the movies? (Is that right?) YES
Didn't you use to go to the movies? (Is that right?) YES

Was you used to drinking wine? (Is that right?) NO Were you ... (The rest is OK.)
Wasn't you used to drinking wine? (Is that right?) NO Weren't you ... (The rest is OK.)

[It's "you were", never "you was".]

I used to smoke. = At some time in the past, I had the habit of smoking.

I was used to smoking. = At that time (in the past) I was accustomed to smoking, i.e., I was familiar and comfortable and experienced with the act of smoking. When I smoked, I didn't gasp and cough like someone who is not used to smoking / not an experienced smoker.

Does this help? I hope so.

Emotion: smile
According to Michael Swan's Practical English Usage, we cannot use USED TO to simply talk about what happened at a past time, or how long it took, or how many times it happened.

a. I used to work very hard last month (WRONG).

How about BE USED TO:

b. I was used to working very hard last month (wrong??right??)

Does that caution also applies to BE USED TO?
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I was used to working very hard last month (wrong??right??) Wrong.

Does that caution also applies apply to BE USED TO? Yes.

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EladioWhat’s the difference between these two sentences? I read both in a dictionary and I’m confused.

She wasn’t used to him away but she soon got used to it. Now she is used to seeing him once in a year.
She didn’t use to him away but she soon got used to it. Now she is used to seeing him once in a year.

The point is that I believe to understand that “She used to” is a past tense, so “She didn’t use to…” is the negative form of this past tense. Now, “She’s used to” is a present tense, so the negative form of this present tense is “She isn’t used to…”. Now, “She wasn’t used to…” sounds to me like a negative (another?) form of the past tense. Is that correct? In above sentences the use of past forms “wasn’t” and “didn’t” tends to confuse, I believe, to a not English speaker, and to think that both are different forms of the past.
Did you use to play tennis when you were younger? (Past, right?)
Are you used to play tennis? (Present, right?)
I don’t know if I’m being clear in explaining my confusion.

Dear Mister Micawber and MrPedantic thank you for your help with my post “Please, help!!”. Mister Micawber, your advice related to the title of that post (“Please, help!!) is important to me. The fact is that I’m a native Spanish speaker and I’m certainly learning the real spoken English in streets and with all of you in EnglishForward; I mean, in Spanish “Please, help!!” doesn’t implies necessarily a panic situation. We’re used to use many exclamation marks. So, I’m sorry. And I would like to thank CalifJim and Clive for their help with my recent post “Needless / unnecessary”.
Hi Eladio,

In addition to the experts' comment, here is my two cents if that may help...

I used to lived next door to John = sometime ago, John was my neighbor. [used to] is a phrasal expression which denotes the long-gone past . i.e. if someone said "I used to care about you", it means the caring no longer exists any more. The use of this phrase is not so much concerned with the exact past time but what happened in the past.

My parents used to take me to the parks on Sundays when I was little.

Be used to means something differenet. i.e. I am used to having my coffee black. This means I am accustomed to drinking coffee without sugar.
She used to drive a car and She is used to driving a car have different meanings.
The former means that she was in the habit of driving a car in the past and that she doesn't drive a car now.
The latter means that she is familiar with driving a car because she has done it or experienced it many times before.
A woman who used to drive a car will not drive one now but a woman who is used to driving a car will drive one now.
Another point to be noted is that we should use a bare-infinitive after used to and a gerund (-ing verb) after be used to.
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